Archives2018-03-28T20:39:16-04:00

2017 Season

The Music Man

(1957) Music, Lyrics and Book by Meredith Willson. Story by Meredith Willson and Franklin Lacey

That a homespun show about the shenanigans of a music peddler in a small Midwest city beat out West Side Story for the 1958 Tony Award for Best Musical speaks volumes.  Meredith Willson drew on memories of his childhood days in Iowa and fashioned the music, lyrics, and book for a seemingly timeless story that continues to capture the hearts of young and old.  Con man “Professor” Harold Hill mesmerizes the residents of River City by selling them musical instruments and uniforms with the promise to form a boys’ band and teach them to play using his “think system.”  The execution of his plan is sidetracked a bit when he falls hard for the local librarian, Marian, and comes under the watchful eye of the mayor, who orders the school board to check out his credentials.  Bring the kids and grandkids to this true American classic and enjoy such tunes as “Ya Got Trouble,” “Goodnight, My Someone,” “Seventy Six Trombones,” “Marian the Librarian,” “Wells Fargo Wagon,” “Gary, Indiana,” and “Till There Was You.”

Conductor: J. Lynn Thompson
Stage Director: Ted Christopher
Choreographer/Assistant Director: Spencer Reese
Set Designer: Justin Miller
Costume Designer: Charlene Gross
Lighting Designer: Justin Gibson
Sound Designer: Christopher Plummer
Charlie Cowell: Jonathan Heller
Conductor: Adam Kirk
Harold Hill: Nathan Brian*/Ted Christopher**
Mayor George Shinn: Kyle Yampiro
Ewart Dunlop: Christopher Sapp
Oliver Hix: Royce Strider
Jacey Squires: Tom Carle
Olin Britt: Peter Morgan
Marcellus Washburn: Benjamin Krumreig
Tommy Djilas: Spencer Reese
Marian Paroo: Sarah Best*/Danielle Knox**
Mrs. Paroo: Alexa Devlin
Amaryllis: Madeleine Christopher
Winthrop Paroo: Bryson Christopher†/Lincoln McMullen
Eulalie Mackecknie Shinn: Yvonne Trobe
Zaneeta Shinn: Olivia Doig
Gracie Shinn: Anna Christopher
Alma Hix: Gretchen Windt
Maud Dunlop: Teresa Perrotta
Ethel Toffelmier: Katherine Corle
Mrs. Squires: Tzytle Steinman
Constable Locke: Nathan Kessel

Ensemble
Tom Carle, Cody Carlson, Grace Caudle, Katherine Corle, Noelle Crites, Alexa Devlin, Olivia Doig, Jonathan Heller, Seth Johnson, Mason Kelso, Nathan Kessel, Adam Kirk, Ivana Martinic, Garrett Medlock, Peter Morgan, Teresa Perrotta, Sarah Polinski, Spencer Reese, Hannah Rowland, Christopher Sapp, Tzytle Steinman, Royce Strider, Megan Taylor, David Varney, Stephen Walley, Gretchen Windt, Kyle Yampiro

Youth Cast
Anna Christopher, Bryson Christopher, Madeleine Christopher, Hope Kennedy, Gracelyn Lepold, Ethan Mann, Emma Martinez, Lincoln McMullen, Oliver Miller, Ella Smucker

Anything Goes

(1934) Music and Lyrics by Cole Porter. Original Book by P. G. Wodehouse & Guy Bolton. Revision: Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse

With 136 show titles to its credit, at Ohio Light Opera … Anything Goes.  Cole Porter’s 1934 masterpiece not only secured his position as the period’s leading Broadway composer, but still stands today as a captivating testament to his incomparable fusion of words and music.  And, in keeping with its mission, OLO presents the show in its original 1934 version, shorn of all the interpolations that have “plagued” more recent productions.  While at a New York bar, evangelist-turned-nightclub-singer Reno Sweeney has fallen for Billy Crocker, who, to be near his girlfriend Hope Harcourt, has stowed away on Reno’s transatlantic cruise ship.  Forced to adopt various disguises to avoid detection, Billy eventually secures a ticket and passport from Reverend Moon, who has been branded Public Enemy No. 13.  Not surprisingly … confusion ensues.  Porter’s revelatory score includes “I Get a Kick Out of You,” “You’re the Top,” “All Through the Night,” “Blow, Gabriel, Blow,” and the knee-slapping title tune.

Conductor: Steven Byess
Stage Director: Steven Daigle
Choreographer/Assistant Director: Spencer Reese
Set Designer: Daniel Hobbs
Costume Designer: Kristina Miller
Lighting Designer: Brittany Shemuga
Sound Designer: Christopher Plummer

Reno Sweeney, evangelist-turned-nightclub singer: Alexa Devlin
Billy Crocker, assistant to Elisha: Spencer Reese
Hope Harcourt, American debutante: Danielle Knox
Mrs. Evangeline Harcourt, Hope’s mother: Julie Wright Costa
Sir Evelyn Oakleigh, Hope’s wealthy English fiancé: Kyle Yampiro
Lord Oakleigh, Evelyn’s father: Ted Christopher
Moonface Martin, “Public Enemy Number 13”: Daniel Neer
Bonnie, sidekick to Moonface: Hilary Koolhoven
Elisha J. Whitney, Ivy League Wall Street banker: Peter Morgan
Reno’s Angels
Purity: Tanya Roberts
Charity: Grace Caudle
Chastity: Teresa Perrotta
Virtue: Sarah Best
The Ritz Quartette/Sailors: Tom Carle, Christopher Sapp, Royce Strider, Jonathan Heller
Charley: Mason Kelso
Wang: Stephen Walley
Captain: Nathan Kessel
Bartender (John): David Varney
Bellboy: Cody Carlson
Reporter: Adam Griffiths
First Cameraman: Nathan Kessel
Bishop Dodson: Garrett Medlock
Snooks: Olivia Doig
Steward Cody: Carlson
Purser: Seth Johnson
First Federal Man: Jonathan Heller
Federal Man: David Varney
Mrs. Wentworth: Yvonne Trobe
Mrs. Frick: Gillian Hollis
Chief Officer: Adam Griffiths
Teenager Hannah Rowland
Teenager: Noelle Crites
Ship’s Drunk: David Varney
Mr. Swift: Garrett Medlock

Ensemble
Sarah Best, Tom Carle, Cody Carlson, Grace Caudle, Noelle Crites, Olivia Doig, Adam Griffiths, Jonathan Heller, Gillian Hollis, Seth Johnson, Mason Kelso, Nathan Kessel, Ivana Martinic, Garrett Medlock, Teresa Perrotta, Sarah Polinski, Tanya Roberts, Hannah Rowland, Christopher Sapp, Tzytle Steinman, Royce Strider, Megan Taylor, Yvonne Trobe, David Varney, Stephen Walley

H.M.S. Pinafore

(1878) Music by Arthur Sullivan. Libretto by William S. Gilbert

Gilbert and Sullivan’s rollicking romp through naval life, class distinctions, and melodramatic villainy has entertained millions since its London premiere.  Where else can one find a First Lord of the Admiralty who had never seen a ship, or a seafaring captain who gets seasick, or a nursemaid who can’t tell one baby from another?  It was the 1879 success of this show in New York—and during that year, there were said to be more than 150 productions playing across the United States—that inspired the American theater community to create its own musical theater tradition.  Josephine, the Captain’s daughter, is in love with able seaman Ralph Rackstraw.  But her father has other plans for her: an advantageous union with the exalted Sir Joseph Porter, K.C.B.  When the young couple’s elopement is thwarted by cantankerous seaman Dick Deadeye, it remains for Little Buttercup to confess that her baby farming techniques had left something to be desired … a many years ago.  Never mind the why and wherefore—to list the catchy tunes in Pinafore is to cite the entire musical score.

Conductor: J. Lynn Thompson, Wilson Southerland
Stage Director: Steven Daigle
Choreographer: Spencer Reese
Set Designer: Daniel Hobbs
Costume Designer: Charlene Gross
Associate Costume Designer: Jennifer Ammons
Lighting Designer: Brittany Shemuga
Sound Designer: Samantha Palumbo

The R. Hon. Sir Joseph Porter, KCB, first lord of the admiralty: Boyd Mackus
Captain Corcoran, commanding the H.M.S. Pinafore: Daniel Neer
Ralph Rackstraw, able seaman: Benjamin Krumreig* Stephen Faulk**
Dick Deadeye, able seaman: Nathan Brian
Bill Bobstay, boatswain’s mate: Ted Christopher
Bob Becket, carpenter’s mate: Peter Morgan
Tom Tucker, midshipmite: Oliver Miller
Josephine, the Captain’s daughter: Hilary Koolhoven* Olivia Doig**
Cousin Hebe, Sir Joseph’s first cousin: Gretchen Windt
Mrs. Cripps / Little Buttercup, a Portsmouth bumboat woman: Alexa Devlin

Ensemble
Nathan Brian, Tom Carle, Ted Christopher, Katherine Corle, Adam Griffiths, Gillian Hollis, Mason Kelso, Nathan Kessel, Grant Knox, Audrey Lee, Ivana Martinic, Peter Morgan, Sarah Polinski, Spencer Reese, Tanya Roberts, Hannah Rowland, Christopher Sapp, Royce Strider, Megan Taylor, Gretchen Windt

Understudy for Captain Corcoran: Royce Strider
Understudy for Dick Deadeye: Peter Morgan

Primrose

(1924) Music by George Gershwin. Book by Guy Bolton and George Grossmith Jr. Lyrics by Desmond Carter and Ira Gershwin

If ever there were a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, this is it—the first fully-staged production in almost a century of George Gershwin’s 1924 musical Primrose.  Written for the London stage (255 performances), but never brought to Broadway, the show reveals the composer fully crossing the threshold into the jazz-inspired stylings that would take Broadway by storm just a few months later in Lady, Be Good!  Although Englishman Desmond Carter wrote the bulk of the lyrics, most of the show’s hit songs were actually adapted by George from tunes he had written earlier to brother Ira’s lyrics.  Offering a tip of the hat to Gilbert and Sullivan, Edwardian musical comedy, and British music hall, the show centers on dapper Toby Mopham, who finds himself engaged to vulgar beautician Pinkie Peach.  To help him out of the situation, he calls on his friend, houseboat-dwelling author Hilary Vane, who himself has fallen in love with ingénue Joan, who reminds him of the character Primrose in his latest story.  After many (and we do mean many) complications, characters, and disguises, everyone winds up with his or her ideal mate.  Song hits include “Wait a Bit, Susie,” “Boy Wanted,” “Some Far Away Someone,” and “Naughty Baby.”

Conductor: Steven Byess
Stage Director: Julie Wright Costa
Choreographer: Spencer Reese
Set Designer: Kiah Kayser
Costume Designer: Kim Griffin
Lighting Designer: Daniel Huston
Sound Designer: Dominic Mosher

Jason: Tom Carle
Freddie Falls: Benjamin Krumreig
May Rooker: Tanya Roberts
Sir Barnaby Falls: Kyle Yampiro
Joan, his ward: Sarah Best
Hilary Vane, a novelist: Nathan Brian
Toby Mopham: Stephen Faulk
Michael, Pinkie’s brother: Cody Carlson
Manager of Hotel: Mason Kelso
Pinkie Peach: Alexa Devlin
Lady Sophia Mopham: Katherine Corle
Pritchard, her maid: Yvonne Trobe
Post Girl: Teresa Perrotta
Hazel: Gretchen Windt
Jenny: Megan Taylor
Jack: Christopher Sapp
Jean: Ivana Martinic
Marjory: Grace Caudle
Maud: Tzytle Steinman
Flower Seller: Grace Caudle
Turk: David Varney
Quartet (Sirens): Olivia Doig, Teresa Perrotta, Sarah Polinski, Megan Taylor

Ensemble
Grace Caudle, Katherine Corle, Olivia Doig, Adam Griffiths, Jonathan Heller, Mason Kelso, Nathan Kessel, Hilary Koolhoven, Ivana Martinic, Garrett Medlock, Teresa Perrotta, Sarah Polinski, Spencer Reese, Christopher Sapp, Royce Strider, Tzytle Steinman, Megan Taylor, Yvonne Trobe, David Varney, Stephen Walley, Gretchen Windt

The Student Prince

(1924) Music by Sigmund Romberg. Book and Lyrics by Dorothy Donnelly. Based on the play Old Heidelberg by Wilhelm Meyer-Förster

The Student Prince, the longest-running Broadway musical of the 1920s, is for many theater-goers the quintessential romantic operetta.  Hungarian-born composer Sigmund Romberg cashed in on his earlier musical training in Vienna and created a magical score of waltzes and marches, all set to Dorothy Donnelly’s adaptation of a 1901 German play titled Old Heidelberg.  Prince Karl-Franz, accompanied by his tutor Dr. Engel and pompous valet Lutz, arrives at Heidelberg University, but finds his studies less enticing than the waitress Kathie at the local inn.  The age-old clash between love and duty rears its head when he is summoned back home to the deathbed of his grandfather and ordered to marry Princess Margaret.  Romberg’s score brims over with tunes that you will be humming as you walk in and walk out of the theater: “Golden Days,” “Overhead the Moon Is Beaming,” “Just We Two,” “Deep in My Heart, Dear,” and, of course, that most rousing of libation songs, “Drink! Drink! Drink!”

Conductor: J. Lynn Thompson
Stage Director: Steven Daigle
Choreographer: Spencer Reese
Set Designer: Daniel Hobbs
Costume Designer: Mark Snyder
Lighting Designer: Brittany Shemuga
Sound Designer: Samantha Palumbo

Four Lackeys: Christopher Sapp, Garrett Medlock, Royce Strider, Jonathan Heller
Prime Minister von Mark: Royce Strider
Doctor Engel, the Prince’s tutor: Boyd Mackus
Prince Karl Franz, heir to the throne: Grant Knox
Gretchen, maid at the Inn: Gretchen Windt
Ruder, keeper of the Inn, Kathie’s uncle: Peter Morgan
Toni, waiter at the Inn: Spiro Matsos
Lutz, the Prince’s valet: Daniel Neer
Hubert, a footman: Cody Carlson
Count Hugo Detlef, student, leader of the Saxon Corps: Benjamin Krumreig
Von Asterberg, student, member of Saxon Corps: Tom Carle
Lucas, student, leader of Rheinisher Corps: Nathan Kessel
Kathie, maid at the Inn: Gillian Hollis
Grand Duchess Anastasia, mother of Princess Margaret: Yvonne Trobe
Princess Margaret, fiancée of Karl Franz: Grace Caudle
Captain Tarnitz, officer attending Princess Margaretv Stephen Faulk
Baron Arnheim, gentleman of the court: Christopher Sapp
Countess Leyden, lady of the court: Hannah Rowland
Captain of the Guard: David Varney
Rudolph Winter, cousin of Kathie: Spencer Reese

Ensemble
Tom Carle, Cody Carlson, Katherine Corle, Stephen Faulk, Adam Griffiths, Jonathan Heller, Mason Kelso, Nathan Kessel, Hilary Koolhoven, Benjamin Krumreig, Audrey Lee, Ivana Martinic, Garrett Medlock, Peter Morgan, Arielle Nachtigal, Teresa Perrotta, Spencer Reese, Hannah Rowland, Christopher Sapp, Tzytle Steinman, Royce Strider, Megan Taylor, David Varney, Stephen Walley, Gretchen Windt

Understudy for Kathie: Oliva Doig
Understudies for Prince Karl Franz: Adam Griffiths and Tom Carle
Understudy for Doctor Engel: Stephen Walley
Understudy for Count Hugo Detlef: David Varney

Countess Maritza

(1924) Music by Emmerich Kálmán. Libretto by Julius Brammer and Alfred Grünwald. English Translation by Nigel Douglas

Among Ohio Light Opera’s many contributions to lyric theater, none has proved more fulfilling and rewarding than the successes it has achieved with the operettas of Hungarian-born Emmerich Kálmán. With 12 titles produced thus far—and more to come—OLO returns this season to what many believe is his supreme masterpiece, Countess Maritza.  Count Tassilo, now penniless, has taken a menial position as manager of one of the estates of the wealthy Maritza.  He hopes to earn enough money to pay off his debts and provide a dowry for his sister Lisa.  To ward off a constant barrage of suitors, Maritza announces a mock engagement to a fictitious pig farmer, a Baron Koloman Zsupán. To her surprise, a real Baron Zsupán shows up and claims her hand. Tassilo, also, has some covering up to do when Lisa appears as part of Maritza’s house party.  As romantic feelings blossom between Tassilo and Maritza, so do their pride and stubbornness as employee and employer—Maritza has no choice but to fire her manager.  But … she has a change of heart.  Song gems include Tassilo’s heartfelt tribute to his home town, “Vienna Mine,” the Maritza-Zsupán duet “Let’s Go to Varasdin,” and Tassilo’s lament “Play, Gypsy.”

Conductor: Wilson Southerland
Stage Director: Steven Daigle
Choreographer: Spencer Reese
Set Designer: Justin Miller
Costume Designer: Kristina Miller
Lighting Designer: Daniel Huston
Sound Designer: Dominic Mosher
Assistant Director: Kyle Yampiro

Countess Maritzav Tanya Roberts
Prince Moritz Dragomir Popolescu: Boyd Mackus
Baron Koloman Zsupán, property owner from Varasdin: Grant Knox
Count Tassilo Endrödy-Wittenburg: Daniel Neer
Lisa, his sister: Katherine Corle
Karl Stephan Liebenberg: Nathan Brian
Princess Bozena Cuddenstein zu Chlumetz: Julie Wright Costa
Penizek, her servant: Kyle Yampiro
Tschekko, an old servant of Maritza: Spiro Matsos
Berko, a gypsy: Stephen Faulk
Manja, young gypsy girl: Teresa Perrotta
Ilka, guest of Maritza: Hannah Rowland
Rosika, village teenage girl: Arielle Nachtigal
Juliska, village teenage girl: Hannah Rowland
Ilonka, village teenage girl: Olivia Doig
Sari, village teenage girl: Gillian Hollis

Ensemble
Sarah Best, Cody Carlson, Grace Caudle, Olivia Doig, Stephen Faulk, Adam Griffiths, Jonathan Heller, Gillian Hollis, Seth Johnson, Nathan Kessel, Adam Kirk, Hilary Koolhoven, Garrett Medlock, Peter Morgan, Arielle Nachtigal, Teresa Perrotta, Sarah Polinski, Hannah Rowland, Tzytle Steinman, Megan Taylor, Yvonne Trobe, David Varney, Stephen Walley, Kyle Yampiro

Understudy for Countess Maritza: Teresa Perrotta
Understudy for Manja: Tzytle Steinman

The Lady of the Slipper

(1912) Music by Victor Herbert. Lyrics by James O’Dea. Book by Anne Caldwell and Lawrence McCarty

Everyone likes a good Cinderella story, so what better way for OLO to introduce this iconic character into its repertoire than with Victor Herbert’s zany musical comedy The Lady of the Slipper.  With stepsisters named Dollbabia and Freakette, a cat named Mouser, and two fellows named Punks and Spooks who emerge from a cornfield (à la Wizard of Oz) to entice Cinderella to the ball and then into the prince’s arms, “zany” is indeed the right term for a show that captured the public’s fancy and became the second-longest-running book musical of 1912.  Recognized by Herbert biographer Edward Waters as “in every way … a major achievement in the American musical theater,” the show features Herbert at his most engagingly diverse: waltzes, galops, marches, a duet (“Meow! Meow! Meow!”) for Cinderella and the cat, a “Witches Ballet,” and the hit duet “A Little Girl at Home” for Cinderella and Prince Maximilian.  For the second time in just three years (recall the hilarious Dream City and the Magic Knight from 2014), OLO presents a Herbert musical that has not been fully-staged in over a century.

Conductor: Steven Byess
Stage Director: Steven Daigle
Choreographer: Spencer Reese
Set Designer: Daniel Hobbs
Costume Designer: Charlene Gross
Lighting Designer: Brittany Shemuga
Sound Designer: Samantha Palumbo

The Crown Prince Maximilian: Benjamin Krumreig
Prince Ulrich, his brother: Royce Strider
Captain Ladislaw, aide-de-camp to Maximilian: Tom Carle
Baron von Nix, Cinderella’s father: Ted Christopher
Atzel, the Baron’s butler: Kyle Yampiro
Mouser, the Baron’s cat: Spencer Reese
Albrecht, a shoemaker: Christopher Sapp
Louis, his assistant: Mason Kelso
Joseph, a milliner: Garrett Medlock
Matthias, a furrier: Jonathan Heller
Punks, from the cornfield: Stephen Faulk
Spooks, from the cornfield: Nathan Brian
Cinderella: Gretchen Windt
Dollbabia, Cinderella’s step-sister: Tanya Roberts
Freakette, Cinderella’s step-sister: Sarah Best
Romneya: Alexa Devlin
The Fairy Godmother: Katherine Corle
Valerie, maid at the Baron’s: Teresa Perrotta
Sophia, Albrecht’s wife: Tzytle Steinman
Irma, Joseph’s wife: Grace Caudle
Clara, Louis’ wife: Olivia Doig
Ludovica, Matthias’ wife: Sarah Polinski
Maida: Gillian Hollis
Gretchen: Arielle Nachtigal
Major Domo: Kyle Yampiro

Ensemble
Tom Carle, Cody Carlson, Grace Caudle, Olivia Doig, Adam Griffiths, Jonathan Heller, Gillian Hollis, Seth Johnson, Mason Kelso, Hilary Koolhoven, Audrey Lee, Garrett Medlock, Ivana Martinic, Arielle Nachtigal, Daniel Neer, Teresa Perrotta, Sarah Polinski, Spencer Reese, Hannah Rowland, Christopher Sapp, Tzytle Steinman, Royce Strider, Yvonne Trobe, David Varney, Stephen Walley, Kyle Yampiro

Understudy for Cinderella: Grace Caudle

2016 Season

Kiss Me Kate

(1948) Music and Lyrics by Cole Porter, Book by Sam and Bella Spewack

“Another op’nin’, another show.” If ever a musical dispelled persistent rumors that its composer was “washed up,” it was Cole Porter’s Kiss Me, Kate. Not only the crowning achievement of his remarkable Broadway career, but one of the supreme glories of American musical theater, the show bristles with captivating “Top 40” tunes in a dazzling variety of musical styles, all set, as an extra bonus, to Shakespeare’s comedy of the sexes The Taming of the Shrew. Stage stars Fred Graham and Lilli Vanessi are divorced, but nevertheless still working together in a Baltimore stage production of the Bard’s comedy. Complications arise when Fred hires a perky cabaret performer Lois Lane to perform the role of Bianca, Fred winds up on the wrong side of two gangsters trying to collect a gambling debt, and Lilli hits the ceiling when she is mistakenly delivered flowers from Fred that he intended for Lois. Virtually every song in the score became a hit: “So in Love,” “Why Can’t You Behave?” “Always True to You in My Fashion,” “I Hate Men,” and “Brush Up Your Shakespeare,” to name just a few. Join us in celebrating Cole Porter’s 125th birthday in the season-opening production of Kiss Me, Kate. Wunderbar!

Music & Lyrics by……………………..Cole Porter
Book by……………..Bella and Samuel Spewack
Conductor……………………………..Steven Byess
Stage Director……………………….Stephen Carr
Choreographer…………………….Spencer Reese
Set Designer…………………………….Ken Martin
Costume Designer……………….Stefanie Genda
Lighting Designer…………………..Kent Sprague
Fred Graham……….
……………………..Ted Christopher, Brad Baron
Lilli Vanessi………Sarah Best, Tanya Roberts
Lois Lane……………………………Hannah Kurth
Bill Calhoun………………………..Stephen Faulk
Harrison Howell………………Clark Sturdevant
First Man (Gangster)……………Kyle Yampiro
Second Man (Gangster)…………Royce Strider
Harry Trevor…………………….Samus Haddad
Hattie…………………………………. Alexa Devlin
Ralph…………………………………….David Geist
Stage Doorman…………….. Bailey Cummings
Paul…………………………………..Spencer Reese
Gremio………………………..Cameron Brownell
Hortensio………………………………. Isaac Assor
Haberdasher………………. Benjamin Krumreig
Nathaniel……………………….Matthew Brennan
Gregory……………………………………Matt Kelly
Phillip……………………………………….Tom Carle
Lilli Vanessi (cover)…………Hilary Koolhoven
Paul (cover)…………………Cameron Brownell

Ensemble

Jessamyn Anderson, Isaac Assor, Matthew Brennan, Cameron Brownell, Alexandra Camastro, Tom Carle, Jacob Clanton, Katherine Corle, Bailey Cummings, Alexa Devlin, Hannah Gauthier, David Geist, Samus Haddad, Matt Kelly, Hilary Koolhoven, Benjamin Krumreig, Amy Livingston, Hannah Miller, Emily Nelson, Katharine Nunn, Spencer Reese, Meagan Sill, Gretchen Windt

Annie Get Your Gun

(1946) Music and Lyrics by Irving Berlin, Book by Herbert and Dorothy Fields

“Irving Berlin has no place in American music. HE IS AMERICAN MUSIC.” With these words, penned in 1924, Broadway composer Jerome Kern captured the essence of the Russian-born immigrant who wrote words and music to some of our most touchingly eloquent song classics, including “God Bless America,” “Always,” “Easter Parade,” and “White Christmas.” But he could let his hair down, too . . . and in 1946 Berlin wrote music and lyrics to a humorous, homespun tale—yet another battle of the sexes—of American folk hero Annie Oakley. Naïve as they come, but a whiz with a rifle, Annie wins a job with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show and falls hard for its handsome shooting star, Frank Butler. When he feels upstaged by her shooting antics and higher marquee billing, he leaves the show and joins a rival company. Attempts at a merger fail and it remains for Chief Sitting Bull to give Annie a lesson on how to win herself an obstinate man. Berlin churned out one winsome song after another, including “Doin’ What Comes Natur’lly,” “You Can’t Get a Man with a Gun,” “The Girl that I Marry,” “Anything You Can Do,” and what became the unofficial entertainment anthem, “There’s No Business like Show Business.”

Music & Lyrics by…………………………..Irving Berlin
Book by……………………Herbert and Dorothy Fields
Conductor…………………………….J. Lynn Thompson
Stage Director………………………………….Jacob Allen
Choreographer……………………………..Spencer Reese
Set Designer…………………………………….Kim Powers
Costume Designer…………………………..Myron Elliott
Lighting Designer…………………….Brittany Shemuga
Annie Oakl………………………………………Alexa Devlin
Frank Butler…………………………………..Nathan Brian
Mr. Clay…………………………………Cameron Brownell
Minnie…………………………………………..Emily Hagens
Dolly Tate……………………………….Julie Wright Costa
Buffalo Bill Cody………………………………..Brad Baron
Charlie Davenport……………………………Kyle Yampiro
Chief Sitting Bull…………………………..Samus Haddad
Pawnee Bill………………………………..Clark Sturdevant
Mac………………………………………………Jacob Clanton
Foster Wilson……………………………………..Matt Kelly
Conductor………………………………………….Tom Carle
Porters…………………………………..Matthew Brennan,
………………………..Christopher Sapp, Jacob Clanton
Mrs. Potter-Porter………………………………Sarah Best
Mr. Schuyler Adams…………………………….Tom Carle
Mrs. Schuyler Adams……………..Jessamyn Anderson
Mr. Percy Ferguson……………………Bailey Cummings
Mrs. Percy Ferguson………………………..Emily Nelson
Mr. Henderson………………………………..Royce Strider
Mrs. Henderson……………………………Katherine Corle
Messenger…………………………………………David Geist
Little Jake………………………………… Madi Christopher
Mary…………………………………………Anna Christopher
Jessie………………………………………. Madison Mitchell
Nellie………………………………………..Elizabeth Perkins
Annie Oakley (cover)…………………….Katharine Nunn

Ensemble

Jessamyn Anderson, Sarah Best, Matthew Brennan, Alexandra Camastro, Tom Carle, Jacob Clanton, Katherine Corle, Bailey Cummings, Hannah Gauthier, David Geist, Matt Kelly, Adam Kirk, Hannah Kurth, Audrey Lee, Amy Livingston, Hannah Miller, Emily Nelson, Spencer Reese, Christopher Sapp, Meagan Sill, Royce Strider, Kyle Yampiro

The Mikado

(1885) Music by Arthur Sullivan, Libretto by William Gilbert
More than 130 years after its premiere, The Mikado—in the timelessness of its characters and situations, its witty lyrics, and succession of engaging tunes—remains a wonder of lyric theater. Tailor Ko-Ko, condemned to death for flirting, is reprieved and appointed Lord High Executioner of Titipu. He is betrothed to his ward Yum-Yum, but she has fallen in love with the Mikado’s son Nanki-Poo. Displeased with the lack of executions in Titipu, the Mikado orders that the situation be rectified. Nanki-Poo, distraught because he cannot marry Yum-Yum, agrees to be executed in a month, provided that he can marry her in the meantime. When the Mikado sees Nanki-Poo’s name on Ko-Ko’s falsified execution affidavit, he condemns Ko-Ko to death for compassing the death of the heir-apparent. “A Wand’ring Minstrel I,” “I’ve Got a Little List,” “Three Little Maids from School,” “The Flowers that Bloom in the Spring,” and “Tit-Willow” are but a few of the song gems that have made this the most popular of the G&S shows.

Music by………………………………………Arthur Sullivan
Libretto by………………………………………..W.S. Gilbert
Conductor………………………………..J. Lynn Thompson
Stage Director………………………………Ted Christopher
Choreographer………………………………..Spencer Reese
Set Designer…………………………………. Charlene Gross
Costume Designer…………………………. Charlene Gross
Lighting Designer…………………………….Daniel Huston
The Mikado of Japan……………………….Samus Haddad
Nanki-Poo…………Benjamin Krumreig, Stephen Faulk
A Noble…………………………………………….Royce Strider
Ko-Ko……………………………………………….Nathan Brian
Pooh-Bah……………………………………………..Brad Baron
Pish-Tush……………………………………………..Isaac Assor
Yum-Yum…………………….Emily Nelson, Emily Hagens
Pitti-Sing………………………………………..Gretchen Windt
Peep-Bo……………………………………….Hilary Koolhoven
Katisha………………………………………………. Alexa Devlin
Nanki-Poo (cover)……………………………………Matt Kelly
Pish-Tush (cover)………………………………..Royce Strider

Ensemble

Jessamyn Anderson, Isaac Assor, Matthew Brennan, Cameron Brownell, Tom Carle, Katherine Corle, Bailey Cummings, Hannah Gauthier, Matt Kelly, Hilary Koolhoven, Audrey Lee, Amy Livingston, Katharine Nunn, Tanya Roberts, Christopher Sapp, Meagan Sill, Mark Snyder, Royce Strider, Clark Sturdevant, Gretchen Windt

Have A Heart

(1917) Music by Jerome Kern, Book and Lyrics by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse

Following on the heels of The Cabaret Girl and Oh, Lady! Lady!!, the Ohio Light Opera continues its survey of Jerome Kern’s early groundbreaking musicals with his 1917 Have a Heart. In addition to its predictably enchanting Kern score—one of his most tuneful—the show features book and lyrics by Guy Bolton and master British humorist P. G. Wodehouse (whose wit won over audiences last season in Gershwin’s Oh, Kay!), marking his Broadway full-score debut. The story centers on department store owner Ruddy Schoonmaker and his estranged wife Peggy, who try to salvage their marriage by spending a night at a Rhode Island beach resort. Their reconciliation efforts seem doomed by the appearance there of Ruddy’s recent paramour, movie actress Dolly Brabazon, and of Peggy’s recent wooer, the counterfeiter Capt. Charles Owen. Only at the intervention of elevator boy Henry—whose lines throughout the show, according to Wodehouse and Bolton, had the customers rolling in the aisles—do the romantic entanglements get resolved. Hit songs include the irresistibly catchy “You Said Something,” Henry’s comical “Napoleon,” and the sublime “And I Am All Alone.”

Music by…………………………………… Jerome Kern
Book and Lyrics by
…………………….Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse
Conductor………………………….J. Lynn Thompson
Stage Director…………………………….Steven Daigle
Choreographer………………………….Spencer Reese
Set Designer………………………………Daniel Hobbs
Costume Designer……………………Hali Hutchison
Lighting Designer………………..Brittany Shemuga
Rutherford “Ruddy” Schoonmaker
…………………………………………………Nathan Brian
Peggy…………………………………………….Sarah Best
Dolly Brabazon………………………..Tanya Roberts
Henry……………………………………….Kyle Yampiro
Lizzie………………………………………Emily Hagens
Ted…………………………………………Stephen Faulk
Mrs. Pyne (Aunt)………………Julie Wright Costa
Matthew Pyne (Uncle)………………. Mark Snyder
Chick Owen……………………………. Spencer Reese
Detective Baker…………………………Royce Strider
Maitre d’Hotel……………………………..David Geist
The Turk…………………………………….. Isaac Assor
Floor Walker…………………………………Matt Kelly
Man of Quartette……………………. Jacob Clanton
Sales Girls……………Katherine Corle, Meagan Sill,
Hannah Kurth, Amy Livingston, Katharine Nunn

Women Shoppers……………….Hilary Koolhoven,
……………….Hannah Miller, Alexandra Camastro

Waitresses………….. Hannah Kurth, Meagan Sill
Bell Boys………………..Matt Kelly, Daniel Huston

Ensemble
Isaac Assor, Cameron Brownell, Alexandra Camastro, Jacob Clanton, Katherine Corle, Bailey Cummings, David Geist, Daniel Huston, Matt Kelly, Adam Kirk, Hilary Koolhoven, Hannah Kurth, Amy Livingston, Hannah Miller, Katharine Nunn, Christopher Sapp, Meagan Sill

La Vie Parisienne

(1866) Music by Jacques Offenbach, Original French Libretto by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy, English Translation by Richard Traubner

Few artists stand as tall above their field as does Jacques Offenbach above French operetta. Following his ground-breaking Orpheus in the Underworld in 1858, he teamed in the mid-1860s with librettists Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy to produce six shows—La belle Hélène, Bluebeard, La vie parisienne, The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein, La Périchole, and The Brigands—that remain among the greatest of all French operettas. La vie parisienne, featuring Offenbach at his most effervescent, is the zany tale of a pair of Parisian wannabe bon vivants Gardefeu and Bobinet, who, having failed in their attempts to woo the cocotte Métella, turn their attentions to the visiting Swedish Baroness de Gondremarck. Her husband, the Baron, seeking a fun Parisian holiday, arrives with a letter of introduction to Métella. All wind up at a jolly party at Gardefeu’s home, which the naïve visiting royalty have been led to believe is a hotel. Offenbach’s first attempt at a full-length domestic operetta comedy, the score teems with waltzes, patter songs, ensembles, and a most recognizable can-can.

Music by………………………………..Jacques Offenbach
Libretto by……..Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy
English Translation by……………. Richard Traubner
Conductor……………………………Wilson Southerland
Stage Director………………………..Julie Wright Costa
Choreographer……………………………..Spencer Reese
Set Designer………………………………….Daniel Hobbs
Costume Designer…………………………Stefanie Genda
Lighting Designer…………………………..Daniel Huston
Bobinet………………………………………….Kyle Yampiro
Un Employé (Porter)……………….. Bailey Cummings
Raoul De Gardefeu………………….. Benjamin Krumreig
Métella…………………………………………..Gretchen Windt
Gontran………………………………………………….Matt Kelly
Joseph…………………………………………….. Jacob Clanton
Le Baron de Gondremarck……………….Ted Christopher
La Baronne de Gondremarck…………………. Meagan Sill
Le Brésilien…………………………………… Clark Sturdevant
Alphonse………………………………………………….Tom Carle
Frick…………………………………………………. Spencer Reese
Gabrielle…………………………………………….Tanya Roberts
Pauline………………………………………….Hilary Koolhoven
Prosper…………………………………………Matthew Brennan
Urbain………………………………………………….. Isaac Assor
Clara………………………………………………..Katherine Corle
Léonie……………………………………………..Katharine Nunn
Louise……………………………………….Alexandra Camastro
Gardefeu (cover)……………………………………….Tom Carle

Ensemble

Jessamyn Anderson, Isaac Assor, Brad Baron, Sarah Best, Matthew Brennan, Alexandra Camastro, Tom Carle, Jacob Clanton, Katherine Corle, Bailey Cummings, Alexa Devlin, Hannah Gauthier, David Geist, Emily Hagens, Matt Kelly, Hilary Koolhoven, Hannah Kurth, Audrey Lee, Hannah Miller, Emily Nelson, Katharine Nunn, Christopher Sapp, Royce Strider, Clark Sturdevant

The Dancing Years

(1939) Music and Book by Ivor Novello, Lyrics by Christopher Hassall
OLO has had request after request over the years . . . finally, here it is: the first American stage production in almost 70 years of Welsh-born Ivor Novello’s The Dancing Years. Novello had a remarkable career: as songwriter (“Keep the Home Fires Burning”), as silent film matinée idol (Alfred Hitchcock’s The Lodger), as Hollywood scriptwriter (credited with the lines “Me Tarzan, You Jane”), as playwright, and as a composer who virtually single-handedly brought romantic musicals (operettas . . . if you like!) back to life in Britain in the 1930s, 40s, and early 50s. The Dancing Years is the tear-jerking story of an opera diva, Maria Ziegler, who befriends and encourages aspiring operetta composer Rudi Kleber. When she misunderstandingly overhears Rudi making a mock marriage proposal to a young woman to whom, years before, he had playfully promised “right of first refusal,” Maria leaves her lover, marries her old admirer, Prince Metterling, and loses all touch with Rudi. Some 12 years later, Rudi and Maria meet again and passions flare . . . but she is accompanied by her 12-year-old son. Song gems include “I Can Give You the Starlight,” “My Dearest Dear,” “Primrose,” and “Waltz of My Heart.”

Devised, Written and Composed by….. Ivor Novello
Lyrics by…………………………….. Christopher Hassall
Conductor…………………………………….. Steven Byess
Stage Director………………………………..Steven Daigle
Choreographer……………………………..Spencer Reese
Set Designer……………………………………..Ken Martin
Costume Designer………………………..Charlene Gross
Lighting Designer…………………… Brittany Shemuga
Maria Ziegler………. Sarah Best | Julie Wright Costa
Cacille Kurt…………………………………. Hannah Kurth
Grete Schone……………………………….. Emily Hagens
Ceruti…………………………………..Benjamin Krumreig
Hattie Watney…………………………………Alexa Devlin
Countess Lotte…………………………..Gretchen Windt
Rudi Kleber………..Nathan Brian | Ted Christopher
Prince Charles Metterling…………….Samus Haddad
Franzel…………………………………………….Isaac Assor
Carl………………………………………..Madi Christopher
Madame Pelotti……………………………Tanya Roberts
Sadun………………………………… Jessamyn Anderson
Lilli……………………………………. Jessamyn Anderson
1st Officer……………………………… Matthew Brennan
2nd Officer…………………………… Cameron Brownell
Elizabeth……………………………………… Emily Nelson
Sonia……………………………………….Hannah Gauthier
Wanda……………………………………………..Audrey Lee
Sari……………………………………… Hilary Koolhoven
Mitzi………………………………………..Amy Livingston
Hilde…………………………………Alexandra Camastro
Emmy………………………………………..Tanya Roberts
Footman…………………………………….Jacob Clanton
Kathie………………………………..Alexandra Camastro
Lorelei……………………………………. Katharine Nunn
Signor Valdo…………………………………….Matt Kelly
The Night Watchman……………. Christopher Sapp
Echo……………………………………………….Matt Kelly
Otto…………………………………..Bryson Christopher
Oscar………………………………….. Matthew Brennan
Schani………………………………………. Royce Strider
Goetzer………………………………………….Matt Kelly
Poldi…………………………………………Spencer Reese
Young Maria Ziegler (cover)……. Jessamyn Anderson

Ensemble

Jessamyn Anderson, Isaac Assor, Matthew Brennan, Cameron Brownell, Alexandra Camastro, Tom Carle, Jacob Clanton, Bailey Cummings, Stephen Faulk, Hannah Gauthier, David Geist, Matt Kelly, Hilary Koolhoven, Audrey Lee, Amy Livingston, Hannah Miller, Emily Neill, Emily Nelson, Katharine Nunn, Spencer Reese, Tanya Roberts, Christopher Sapp, Royce Strider

The Little Dutch Girl

(1920) Music by Emmerich Kálmán, Original German Libretto by Leo Stein and Béla Jenbach English Translation by Steven A. Daigle

The year 2015 marked the 100th anniversary of Hungarian-born Emmerich Kálmán’s operetta Die Csárdásfürstin (The Gypsy Princess). With this work, the composer began a remarkable—and virtually unprecedented—string of eight consecutive operetta masterpieces for the Vienna stage, all achieving great international popularity. In the third of these, Das Hollandweibchen (The Little Dutch Girl), Kálmán set out to “scale back the . . . modern dance genre and . . . assign a larger role to the chorus . . . modeled on our grand classical operettas.” German Princess Jutta is stood up at her arranged royal wedding by groom Prince Paul, whom she has never met, but who prefers to spend the day sailing on a lake in Holland. Through the machinations of her prime minister, she is nevertheless married by proxy to the absent Prince. She seeks revenge and travels to Holland, disguises herself as “a little Dutch girl” Bella, and gets the unsuspecting Prince to fall hard for her—she then reveals her identity and dumps him. The lovesick Paul follows her back to Germany, but to no avail . . . or so it seems. Kálmán’s musical score is masterful, highlighted by a most fiery Hungarian quartet and frenzied dance sequence.
New Performance Edition and English Translation
by Steven Daigle
Music by…………………………………. Emmerich Kálmán
Libretto by………………………Leo Stein and Béla Jenbach
Conductor………………………………… Steven Byess
Stage Director……………………………Steven Daigle
Choreographer…………………………….Spencer Reese
Set Designer…………………….. Tymberley Whitesel
Costume Designer………………………..Stefanie Genda
Lighting Designer………………………..Daniel Huston
Princess Jutta……………………………Meagan Sill
Baroness Elly, from the Weyde, first maid of honor
Jessamyn Anderson

Chatelaine Sallina Frelln Webel Horst…….Gretchen Windt
Marshal of Eberius………………………..David Geist
Von Stopp, lord chamberlain…………..Benjamin Krumreig
Prince Adalbert, Jutta’s uncle…………….. Brad Baron
Paul Roderich, crown prince of Usingen….Clark Sturdevant
Dr. Udo von Sterzel, extraordinary ambassador of Usingen
Samus Haddad

Von Oppel, minister of Usingen………….Spiro Matsos
Von Seydenhecht, minister of Usingen………Nathan Brian
Von Trockenrodt, minister of Usingen………Stephen Faulk
Four newlyweds
Emily Nelson, Tanya Roberts, Alexandra Camastro, Hannah Kurth

Von Tiedemann, president…… Matthew Brennan
Baron Seeborg……………….Tom Carle
Von Melow……………..Kyle Yampiro
Von Wetterling……….Spencer Reese
Klaas, host…………………Isaac Assor
Coachman…………. Cameron Brownell
Princess Jutta (cover)…..Katherine Corle

Ensemble

Isaac Assor, Brad Baron, Matthew Brennan, Nathan Brian, Cameron Brownell,
Alexandra Camastro, Tom Carle, Jacob Clanton, Katherine Corle, Stephen Faulk,
Hannah Gauthier, David Geist, Emily Hagens, Hilary Koolhoven, Hannah Kurth, Audrey Lee, Amy Livingston, Spiro Matsos, Hannah Miller, Emily Neill, Emily Nelson, Katharine Nunn, Spencer Reese, Tanya Roberts, Christopher Sapp, Kyle Yampiro

2015 Season

Brigadoon

(1947) Music by Frederick Loewe, Lyrics and Book by Alan Jay Lerner
One of the most beloved American musicals, Lerner and Loewe’s 1947 Brigadoon not only propelled its composer and lyricist toward the front ranks of Broadway, as rivals to Rodgers and Hammerstein, but also introduced to musical theater a new type of other-worldly romanticism. Americans Tommy and Jeff, while on a hunting trip in Scotland, stumble on an unmapped village, whose citizens are in the midst of a fair and also celebrating the impending marriage of Charlie and Jean. Jean’s older sister Fiona and Tommy take an immediate liking to one another, while the brazen village lass Meg wastes no time in pursuing Jeff. When Tommy notes that the locals have never heard of a telephone and that Charlie has attached the date 1746 to his bible signature, he questions Fiona on the strange goings-on. She leads him to the local schoolmaster, Mr. Lundie, who explains that Brigadoon appears only one day every hundred years. Disenchanted by local events, Tommy and Jeff return to New York, but are soon drawn back to the Highlands. But Brigadoon has vanished … or has it? Song hits include Jean’s “Waitin’ for My Dearie,” Tommy’s “Almost Like Being in Love” and “There But for You Go I,” Charlie’s “Come to Me, Bend to Me,” and Meg’s show-stopping “The Love of My Life.”
Music by………. Frederick Loewe
Book & Lyrics by……….. Alan Jay Lerner
Stage Director…………. Jacob Allen
Conductor………….J. Lynn Thompson
Choreographer………..Carol Hageman
Set Designer………. Michael Benson
Costume Designer……… Charlene Gross
Lighting Designer……….Erich Keil
Dialect Design…….Paul Meir Dialect Services, LLC
Tommy Albright, a well-to-do New Yorker….Nathan Brian
Jeff Douglas, Tommy’s friend………Brad Baron
Maggie Anderson………. Holly Flack
Archie Beaton, Harry’s father…Kyle Yampiro
Angus MacGuffie, head of his clan…. Mark Snyder
Meg Brockie…… Olivia Maughan, Gretchen Windt
Stuart Dalrymple……….. Jaron Putnam
Sandy Dean …………..Paul Holmes
Harry Beaton, Archie’s son….. Spencer Reese
Andrew MacLaren, father to Fiona and Jean
Clark Sturdevant

Fiona MacLaren, Andrew’s eldest daughter
Katherine Polit

Jean MacLaren, Andrew’s youngest daughter, engaged to Charlie
Emily Hagens

Charlie Dalrymple, engaged to Jean
Stephen Faulk, Benjamin Krumreig

Fishmonger……….Andrew Zapata
Mr. Lundie, schoolmaster of Brigadoon….Ted Christopher
Ian MacGregor, head of his clan…….Samus Haddad

Sword Dancers
Brad Karel, C.J. David, Kyle Yampiro, Spencer Reese

Bagpiper………Victor Welsch
Frank, a bartender in New York………C.J. David
Jane Ashton, Tommy’s fiancée in New York….. Caitlin Ruddy

Ensemble

Townsfolk of Brigadoon Jessamyn Anderson, Ted Christopher, Katherine Corle, C.J. David, Holly Flack, Samus Haddad, Paul Holmes, Adrienne Jones, Bradley Karel, Hannah Kurth, Audrey Lee, Emily Nelson, Jaron Putnam, Spencer Reese, Sarah Roth, Caitlin Ruddy, Ashley Shamy, Meagan Sill, Mark Snyder, Royce Strider, Clark Sturdevant, Amelia Sutherland, Alexandra Vecchio, Kyle Yampiro, Andrew Zapata

Cole Porter’s Can-Can

(1953) Music and Lyrics by Cole Porter, Book by Abe Burrows
For many theater historians and Broadway enthusiasts, the greatest of all American song composers, Cole Porter brought more of himself, his extraordinary life, and his times to his stage works than any of his contemporaries. The Ohio Light Opera, following in the footsteps of its recently acclaimed productions of Porter’s rarely staged Jubilee and Silk Stockings, turns its attention this season to the ever-engaging Can-Can, set in 1893 in Porter’s beloved Paris, and featuring one of the composer’s most glorious scores. Can-can dancers at La Môme Pistache’s Montmartre nightclub are constantly arrested, and then acquitted, on morals charges. A new, upright judge, Aristide, pays a visit to the club to see for himself – he is determined to enforce the law and get results. Instead, he is enchanted by the dance and falls hard for Pistache, eventually gets disbarred, and joins with his paramour in getting arrested so that he can have his own day in court and, with Pistache, refute the obscenity charges. Few shows have contributed more tunes to the Top 40 charts: “C’est Magnifique,” “Live and Let Live,” “Allez-Vous En,” “It’s All Right with Me,” and the haunting “I Love Paris.”

Music & Lyrics by……………………….Cole Porter
Book by………………………………….Abe Burrows
Stage Director……………………….. Steven Daigle
Conductor………………………………….Steven Byess
Choreographer……………………….Carol Hageman
Set Designer……………………………. Cassie King
Costume Designer………………. Charlene Gross
Lighting Designer………………………. Erich Keil
Assistant Stage Director…………….Spencer Reese
Bailiff ……………….. Jaron Putnam
Court President, Henri Marceaux ………..Brad Baron
Judge Paul Barriere …………………Kyle Yampiro
Judge Aristide Forestier………………Ted Christopher
Gabrielle …………………………… Holly Flack
Marie…………………… Caitlin Ruddy
Celestine…………………….. Hannah Kurth
Girl…………………………. Alexandra Vecchio
Claudine……………………. Jessamyn Anderson
Policeman…………………….. Royce Strider
Second Policeman…………… Bradley Karel
Hilaire Jussac, art critic………….. Boyd Mackus
Boris Adzinidzinadze, Bulgarian sculptor…….Stephen Faulk
Waiter………………. Spencer Reese
Second Waiter…………… Jaron Putnam
La Môme Pistache, owner of the Bal du Paradis………. Sarah Best
Hercule…………………………….C.J. David
Étienne……………….. Clark Sturdevant
Théophile………………… Andrew Gilstrap
Photographer…………………… Andrew Zapata
Nun…………………………………….. Sarah Diller
Model………………………. Emily Hagens
Jailor………………………………… Paul Holmes
Rainbow…………………………… Brad Baron
Mimi…………………… Katherine Corle
Tabac Waiter………………… Royce Strider
Monarchist……………………..Kyle Yampiro
Doctor…………………….. Jaron Putnam
Turnkey………………………Paul Homes
Prosecutor…………………. Matt Kelly
Man…………………………….Brad Baron
Woman………………….. Sarah Diller
Second…………………….Brad Baron

Ensemble

Brad Baron, Katherine Corle, C.J. David, Sarah Diller, Holly Flack, Andrew Gilstrap, Emily Hagens, Paul Holmes, Bradley Karel, Matt Kelly, Hannah Kurth, Jaron Putnam, Spencer Reese, Caitlin Ruddy, Laura Schneider, Ashley Shamy, Meagan Sill, Royce Strider, Clark Sturdevant, Amelia Sutherland, Alexandra Vechhio, Kyle Yampiro, Andrew Zapata

One Touch Of Venus

(1943) Music by Kurt Weill, Lyrics by Ogden Nash, Book by Ogden Nash and S.J. Perelman
A most intriguing combination indeed: the comical and romantic lyrics of America’s master of light verse, Ogden Nash; the witty and stylish dialogue of humorist S. J. Perelman; and the captivating musical score of Kurt Weill. One Touch of Venus exploits that ever-popular premise of a statue of Venus that comes to life, but can’t quite adapt to the real world. Art aficionado Whitelaw Savory has installed in his museum a statue of Venus that bears a resemblance to a former girlfriend. The statue comes to life, but takes a liking not to its owner, but rather to Savory’s barber Rodney Hatch, from Ozone Heights. Rodney’s fiancée Gloria is furious, Savory is despondent over his unrequited love for Venus, and Venus has her hands full in winning over the reticent Rodney. This show is perhaps the closest that Weill ever came to pure musical comedy – but with an obvious debt to operetta. Song hits include Venus’ “I’m a Stranger Here Myself,” Savory’s “West Wind,” and the irresistibly seductive “Speak Low,” with which Venus tries to ensnare Rodney after she has whisked Gloria off to the North Pole. One Touch of Venus has been one of OLO’s most requested titles, and Kurt Weill, not heard at OLO since last century, remains one of musical theater’s greatest ambassadors.

Music by………………………………………………. Kurt Weill
Lyrics by………………………………………….. Ogden Nash
Book by………………. Ogden Nash and S. J. Perelman
Stage Director…………………………………………. Steven Daigle
Conductor………………………………………………..Steven Byess
Choreographer………………………………………Carol Hageman
Set Designer……………………………………………..Daniel Hobbs
Costume Designer…………………………………. Stefanie Genda
Lighting Designer……………………………………………. Erich Keil
Assistant Stage Director………………………….Spencer Reese
Whitelaw Savory, multi-millionaire art collector…………….. Brad Baron
Molly Grant, his assistant………………………………………Hannah Kurth
Rodney Hatch, a barber……………………………….Benjamin Krumreig
Venus, a goddess…………………………………………………….Sarah Best
Gloria Kramer, Rodney’s fiancée………………………….Gretchen Windt
Mrs. Kramer, her mother…………………………………………Sandra Ross
Zuvetli, an Anatolian…………………………………………Clark Sturdevant
Taxi Black, a private detective………………………………… Kyle Yampiro
Stanley, his assistant…………………………………………Andrew Gilstrap
First Student……………………………………………………….Ashley Shamy
Second Student………………………………………….. Amelia Sutherland
Dr. Crippen……………………………………………………….Spencer Reese
Truckmen………………………………………Paul Holmes, Royce Strider
Woman Welder…………………………………………………. Katherine Polit
Bus Starter…………………………………………………………..Paul Holmes
Mrs. Moats, a landlady……………………………………… Olivia Maughan
Rose…………………………………………………………..Alexandra Vecchio
Dr. Rook…………………………………………………………….Jaron Putnam
Sam………………………………………………………………. Samus Haddad
Store Manager…………………………………………………………. C.J. David
Salesgirl…………………………………………………………..Adrienne Jones
Men………………………………………. Spencer Reese, Andrew Zapata
Police Lieutenant……………………………………………………… Matt Kelly
Policeman…………………………………………………………. Royce Strider
Attendant…………………………………………………………. Jaron Putnam
Another Student………………………………………………..Spencer Reese
Matron………………………………………………………………..Caitlin Ruddy

Ensemble
Jessamyn Anderson, C.J. David, Sarah Diller, Andrew Gilstrap, Samus Haddad, Emily Hagens, Paul Holmes, Adrienne Jones, Bradley Karel, Matt Kelly, Olivia Maughan, Emily Nelson, Katherine Polit, Jaron Putnam, Spencer Reese, Caitlin Ruddy, Laura Schneider, Ashley Shamy, Meagan Sill, Royce Strider, Amelia Sutherland, Alexandra Vecchio, Andrew Zapata

Oh, Kay!

(1926) Music by George Gershwin, Lyrics by Ira Gershwin, Book by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse
If there were any doubts about the impact that George and Ira Gershwin would have on Broadway following their groundbreaking Lady, Be Good! in 1924, they were quickly dispelled two years later when Oh, Kay! opened to near-unanimous rave reviews and produced a handful of tunes that soon became standards. Written as a vehicle for Gertrude Lawrence, the comical plotline invoked a hot topic of the day: bootlegging. The book by Guy Bolton and master of comic fantasy P. G. Wodehouse concerns a rum-running operation, clandestinely based in the Long Island home of out-of-town Jimmy Winter, and run by the aristocratic Duke of Durham and his sister Lady Kay. Jimmy returns with a caustic new bride Constance, who, because of a question over the legality of the marriage, has to spend the night away from the house. Kay, to escape bad weather, blunders into the house and, to avoid detection by an inquisitive revenue officer, is sequestered in the bedroom by Jimmy, eventually posing as both Mrs. Winter and Jimmy’s maid to escape the prying eyes of Constance and her father. “Clap Yo’ Hands,” “Fidgety Feet,” “Do, Do, Do,” and the incomparable “Someone to Watch Over Me” are but a sampling of the tunes in this top-notch Gershwin score.

Music by…………………………………… George Gershwin
Lyrics by………………………………………….. Ira Gershwin
Additional Lyrics by …………………………..Howard Dietz
Book by…………….. Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse
Stage Director……………………………………… Ted Christopher
Conductor……………………………………….. J. Lynn Thompson
Choreographer………………………………………Carol Hageman
Set Designer………………………………………………. Cassie King
Costume Designer…………………………………. Stefanie Genda
Lighting Designer……………………………………………. Erich Keil
Molly Morse……………………………………………………….. Caitlin Ruddy
Peggy……………………………………………………………. Katherine Corle
The Duke of Durham, an English bootlegger……………..Kyle Yampiro
Lady Kay, his sister ……………………………………………..Emily Hagens
Larry Potter, a bootlegger………………………………….. Spencer Reese
“Shorty” McGee, a bootlegger…………………………….Samus Haddad
Phillipa “Phil” Ruxton, twin to Dolly…………………………….. Sarah Best
Dolly Ruxton, twin to Phillipa…………………………. Alexandra Vecchio
Jimmy Winters…………………………………………………… Nathan Brian
Constance Appleton, Jimmy’s bride……………. Jessamyn Anderson
Judge, her father…………………………………………………Boyd Mackus
Revenue Officer Jansen………………………………. Benjamin Krumreig
Assistant Revenue Officer………………………………….Andrew Gilstrap
Mae……………………………………………………………………… Holly Flack
Daisy…………………………………………………………………Hannah Kurth
Pinkham………………………………………………………….Gretchen Windt
Wally………………………………………………………………… Jaron Putnam
Chauffeur………………………………………………………… Andrew Zapata

Ensemble

Katherine Corle, Holly Flack, Andrew Gilstrap, Paul Holmes, Bradley Karel, Matt Kelly, Hannah Kurth, Emily Nelson, Katherine Polit, Jaron Putnam, Sarah Roth, Caitlin Ruddy, Laura Schneider, Ashley Shamy, Meagan Sill, Mark Snyder, Amelia Sutherland, Gretchen Windt, Kyle Yampiro, Andrew Zapata

Ruddigore

(1887) Music by Arthur Sullivan, Libretto by W. S. Gilbert

Although audience reaction at its 1887 premiere, just a few days following the end of the long run of The Mikado, was lukewarm, Ruddigore has since fought its way back in the hearts of Gilbert and Sullivan lovers and is now recognized as one of their most inspired creations. Gilbert designed the plot – featuring witches, curses, ghosts, crime, and a madwoman – as a parody of old-fashioned melodramas. The plot centers on Ruthven Murgatroyd, who has abandoned his position as baronet and its curse-induced obligation to commit a crime every day, and is now living a simple, carefree life as villager Robin Oakapple. That is … until he falls in love with Rose Maybud, his jealous foster brother Richard Dauntless reveals his true identity, and he is forced to resume his baronet position. Musical highlights include the ghostly “When the Night Wind Howls,” sung by chief ancestor Roderic Murgatroyd as he descends from his portrait; the catchy, tongue-twisting patter trio, “My Eyes Are Fully Open”; “I Was Once a Very Abandoned Person,” intoned by the reformed Despard and Mad Margaret; and Roderic and Dame Hannah’s exquisite duet, “There Grew a Little Flower.”
Music by……………………………………….. Arthur Sullivan
Libretto by………………………………….William S. Gilbert
Stage Director…………………………………………. Steven Daigle
Conductor………………………………………………..Steven Byess
Choreographer……………………………………….Spencer Reese
Set Designer………………………………………… Michael Benson
Costume Designer………………………………….Adrienne Jones
Lighting Designer……………………………………………. Erich Keil
Assistant Stage Director………………………….Spencer Reese
Sir Ruthven Murgatroyd (disguised as young farmer Robin Oakapple)………… Nathan Brian
Richard Dauntless, his foster-brother…………………..Stephen Faulk
Sir Despard Murgatroyd, a wicked baronet………..Ted Christopher
Old Adam Goodheart, Robin’s faithful servant……Andrew Gilstrap
Rose Maybud, a village maiden………………………… Katherine Polit
Dame Hannah, Roses’ Aunt……………………….. Julie Wright Costa
Mad Margaret……………………………………………………….Sarah Best
Zorah, professional bridesmaid……………………………….Sarah Diller
Ruth, professional bridesmaid………………………….Katherine Corle
Sir Roderic Murgatroyd, the 21st baronet…………………Brad Baron
Ghost 1…………………………………………………………….Mark Snyder
Ghost 2…………………………………………………………….Paul Holmes
Ghost 3……………………………………………………………….. C.J. David
Ghost 4……………………………………………………….. Samus Haddad

Ensemble

Brad Baron, Katherine Corle, C.J. David, Holly Flack, Samus Haddad, Emily Hagens, Paul Holmes, Matt Kelly, Hannah Kurth, Olivia Maughan, Emily Nelson, Jaron Putnam, Spencer Reese, Caitlin Ruddy, Laura Schneider, Ashley Shamy, Mark Snyder, Royce Strider, Amelia Sutherland, Alexandra Vecchio, Andrew Zapata

Friederike

(1928) Music by Franz Lehár, English Libretto by Adrian Ross and Harry S. Pepper
Few, if any, German cultural figures are revered as much as poet/playwright/novelist Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. It was thus quite a daring step when famed composer Franz Lehár and his librettists chose to write an operetta about his early days as a struggling poet and his love affair with Friederike Brion, daughter of an Alsacian village parson. The operetta’s plot centers on Goethe’s sought-after appointment as court poet in Weimar, which, because of past court experiences, will be approved by the reigning Duke only if Goethe remains a bachelor. Intent on marrying Friederike, he refuses the post. Recognizing the importance of the opportunity to her beloved’s career, she begins flirting with his best friend Lenz. Thinking her unfaithful, Goethe accepts the court position, bids Friederike a cold farewell, and heads for Weimar. Years later, he passes through her home town again and only then learns the truth. But is it too late? Lehár poured out his heart in writing one of his most beautiful scores. Operetta lovers will most certainly recognize several tunes, including “Oh, Maiden, My Maiden,” sung by Goethe as he revels in his court poet offer and the belief, at that moment, that he will be enjoying it with the love of his life, and Friederike’s “Why Did You Kiss My Heart Awake?” as she struggles with the heartwrenching decision that she feels obligated to make.
English version by Adrian Ross and Harry S. Pepper Used by arrangement with European American Music Distributors Company, U.S. and Canadian agent for Glocken Verlag Ltd., London, publisher and copyright owner.

Music by………………………………………………………….Franz Lehár
Book and lyrics by………………………….. Ludwig Herzer and Fritz Löhner-Beda
Stage Director……………………………………….. Steven Daigle
Conductor…………………………………….Wilson Southerland
Choreographer…………………………………… Carol Hageman
Set Designer……………………………………………..Cassie King
Costume Designer………………………………..Charlene Gross
Lighting Designer…………………………. Shannon Schweitzer
Assistant Stage Director…………………………. Michael Lucas
Karl August, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar…………..Samus Haddad
Johann Jakob Brion, pastor of Sesenheim……………..Kyle Yampiro
Magdalena, his wife………………………………………. Olivia Maughan
Salomea, their daughter…………………………………. Gretchen Windt
Friederike, their daughter……………………………………….Meagan Sill
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, law student………. Clark Sturdevant
Jakob Lenz, a theological student………………………..Stephen Faulk
Friedrich Weyland, medical student………………….. Andrew Gilstrap
Franz Lerse……………………………………………………………. Matt Kelly
Georg Engelbach………………………………………………Royce Strider
Johann Heinrich Jung-Stilling……………………………………. C.J. David
John Meyer…………………………………………….. Benjamin Krumreig
Captain Karl Ludwig von Knebel,tutor at the Court of Weimar………………………….Samus Haddad
Madame Schöll………………………………………… Julie Wright Costa
Hortense, her daughter…………………………………….Katherine Polit
Madame Hahn……………………………………………………. Sarah Best
Liselotte……………………………………………………………Emily Hagens
Dorothée…………………………………………………………Caitlin Ruddy
Annette………………………………………………………….. Hannah Kurth
Babette……………………………………………………………… Holly Flack
Christel……………………………………………………….Laura Schneider
Clarrie……………………………………………………………..Emily Nelson
Lottie…………………………………………………………. Katherine Corle
Babbie………………………………………………… Jessamyn Anderson
Mollie……………………………………………………………. Ashley Shamy
A Postilion……………………………………………………….Nathan Brian
Schöpflin……………………………………………………….. Spiro Matsos
A Peasant………………………………………………………….Alexandra Vecchio
Another Peasant…………………………………………………………..Sarah Best
Servant…………………………………………………………….Alexandra Vecchio
Servant……………………………………………………………………Nate Brian

Ensemble

Jessamyn Anderson, Sarah Best, Nathan Brian, Katherine Corle, C.J. David, Holly Flack, Andrew Gilstrap, Samus Haddad, Emily Hagens, Bradley Karel, Matt Kelly, Benjamin Krumreig, Hannah Kurth, Spiro Matsos, Emily Nelson, Katherine Polit, Caitlin Ruddy, Laura Schneider, Ashley Shamy, Royce Strider, Alexandra Vecchio, Andrew Zapata

The Yeomen Of The Guard

(1888) Music by Arthur Sullivan, Libretto by W. S. Gilbert
In its combination of comedy and pathos, and the human, rather than farcical, qualities of its characters, The Yeomen of the Guard holds a unique place among the Gilbert and Sullivan operettas. In an inheritance scam by a scheming relative, the bearded Colonel Fairfax has been condemned to death and is to be executed at the Tower of London. Sergeant Meryll, of the Yeomen of the Guard, concocts a plan whereby his son Leonard, arriving to join the Yeomen, will go into hiding and be impersonated by a beardless, unrecognizable Fairfax, thus providing time to seek a pardon. In order to thwart his unscrupulous kinsman, Fairfax begs the Tower Lieutenant to find him a wife. Meanwhile, jester Jack Point and his intended bride, the strolling singer Elsie Maynard, have arrived in town. The Lieutenant confronts Elsie and, with the promise of 100 crowns and an assurance to Jack that her new husband will soon be dead, Elsie is blindfolded, whisked away, and married to Fairfax. But the plan goes awry… Both Gilbert and Sullivan felt that Yeomen was their finest collaboration. There are few, if any, songs in the operetta repertoire as sincere and emotionally grabbing as Jack and Elsie’s “I Have a Song to Sing, O!”
Music by……………………………………….. Arthur Sullivan
Libretto by………………………………….William S. Gilbert
Stage Director………………………………….. Julie Wright Costa
Conductor……………………………………….. J. Lynn Thompson
Choreographer……………………………………….Spencer Reese
Set Designer…………………………………… Tymberley Whitesel
Costume Designer…………………………………. Stefanie Genda
Lighting Designer…………………………… Shannon Schweitzer
Sir Richard Cholmondeley, Lieutenant of the Tower……Kyle Yampiro
Colonel Fairfax, under sentence of death…………… Clark Sturdevant
Sergeant Meryll, of the Yeomen of the Guard……………Boyd Mackus
Leonard Meryll, his son………………………………………..Stephen Faulk
Jack Point, a strolling jester……………………………….Ted Christopher
Wilfred Shadbolt, head jailer and assistant tormenter…….Brad Baron
The Headsman…………………………………………………Samus Haddad
First Yeoman…………………………………………….. Benjamin Krumreig
Second Yeoman……………………………………………………Paul Holmes
First Citizen………………………………………………………… Royce Strider
Second Citizen…………………………………………………. Michael Lucas
Elsie Maynard, a strolling singer………………………………Emily Nelson
Phoebe Meryll, Sergeant Meryll’s daughter……………Olivia Maughan
Dame Carruthers, housekeeper to the Tower……………. Sandra Ross
Kate, her niece……………………………………………………… Sarah Diller

Ensemble

Jessamyn Anderson, Nathan Brian, Katherine Corle, C.J. David, Holly Flack, Andrew Gilstrap, Samus Haddad, Paul Holmes, Bradley Karel, Matt Kelly, Benjamin Krumreig, Michael Lucas, Katherine Polit, Jaron Putnam, Spencer Reese, Sarah Roth, Laura Schneider, Meagan Sill, Royce Strider, Amelia Sutherland, Lauren Vanden Broeck, Gretchen Windt

2014 Season

My Fair Lady

(1956) Music by Frederick Loewe, Book and Lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner
Its literary source, setting, and original stars were thoroughly British, its composer was born in Germany, its librettist educated in England – and yet My Fair Lady could only have been a creation of Broadway. From its 1956 opening to its close more than six years later as the longest-running musical in Broadway history, the show captured the hearts of theater-goers as no musical before or since. Phonetics professor Henry Higgins accepts a bet from his friend, Colonel Pickering, that he cannot groom a bedraggled Covent Garden flower girl, Eliza Doolittle, and pass her off to his society friends as a lady. When, after months of coaching, “the rain in Spain” falls eloquently off her tongue, the transformation is complete, as Eliza impresses Higgins’ socialite friends at Ascot and at the Embassy Ball. But she rails against her mentor for turning her into something that she is not. She returns to Covent Garden, unrecognized by her friends and thoroughly disenchanted. Only now does Higgins realize his true feelings for her. But maybe too late – Freddy Eynsford-Hill has asked for her hand … Almost every song achieved hit status: “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly,” “With a Little Bit of Luck,” “I Could Have Danced All Night,” “On the Street Where You Live,” “Get Me to the Church on Time,” and “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face.”

Adapted from George Bernard Shaw’s Play and Gabriel Pascal’s motion picture Pygmalion

Book & Lyrics by………………………….Alan Jay Lerner
Music by……………………………………Frederick Loewe
Stage Director:……………………………………………Jacob Allen
Conductor:………………………………………… Lynn Thompson
Choreographer:……………………………………Carol Hageman
Assistant Director:………………………………….Spencer Reese
Set Designer:…………………………………………….Kim Powers
Costume Designer:………………………………. Stefanie Genda
Lighting Designer:……………………………..Weston Wilkerson
Sound Designer:…………………………………………………………….Andy Kauff
Dialect Design:……………………………………..Paul Meier Dialect Services, LC
Eliza Doolittle……………………………….Natalie Ballenger, Tanya Roberts
Henry Higgins………………………………………………………Ted Christopher
Mrs. Pearce………………………………………………………….Olivia Maughan
Zoltan Karpathy…………………………………………………….. Stefan Gordon
Alfred P. Doolittle……………………………………………………….. Daniel Neer
Freddy Eynsford-Hill………………………………………………. Stephen Faulk
…………………………………………………………………… Andrew Maughan
Colonel Pickering……………………………………………………Anthony Maida
Mrs. Higgins ……………………………………………………Julie Wright Costa
Mrs. Eynsford-Hill……………………………………………………… Alexa Devlin
Lady Boxington……………………………………………………..Gretchen Windt
Lord Boxington………………………………………………………….Mark Snyder
Mrs. Hopkins…………………………………………………………… Emily Nelson
Jamie………………………………………………………………..Clark Sturdevant
Harry…………………………………………………………………… Stefan Gordon
Cockney Quartet………………………………..C.J. David, Jayson Lebaron, Christopher Calderazzo, Paul Holmes
Higgins’ Servants………………Wendy Marck, Tara Sperry, Janie Crick, Hannah Kurth, Jayson Lebaron, Michael Lucas
Selsey Man……………………………………………………….. Colin Commager
Hoxton Man…………………………………………………………Andrew Gilstrap
Bartender…………………………………………………….Christopher Oglesby
Policeman…………………………………………………………..Andrew Gilstrap
Footman………………………………………………………………………C.J. David
Queen of Transylvania…………………………………………….Gretchen Windt

Dialect samples courtesy of the International Database of English Accents

Ensemble

Servants, Cockneys, Opera-Goers, Ascot Racetrack Devotees, Embassy Ball Patrons, Street Buskers Christopher Calderazzo, Grace Caudle, Colin Commager, Janie Crick, C.J. David, Alexa Devlin, Chelsea Friedlander, Andrew Gilstrap, Stefan Gordon, Paul Holmes, Hannah Kurth, Jayson Lebaron, Michael Lucas, Wendy Marck, Emily Nelson, Christopher Oglesby, Arielle Schmidt, Mark Snyder, Tara Sperry, Clark Sturdevant, Gretchen Windt

Call Me Madam

(1950) Music and Lyrics by Irving Berlin, Book by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse
“Irving Berlin has no place in American music. HE IS AMERICAN MUSIC.” This observation, by no less than Jerome Kern, was offered even years before Berlin wrote “Easter Parade,” “There’s No Business Like Show Business,” “White Christmas,” and hundreds of other songs that only further solidified his position as America’s favorite songwriter. Although he contributed a few hundred songs to Broadway musical revues, he wrote the scores for only seven book musicals, including Annie Get Your Gun and, in 1950, the engaging Call Me Madam, based on episodes in the life of Washington socialite Perle Mesta. In the show, Sally Adams, the “Hostess with the Mostes’ on the Ball,” has been appointed ambassador to the Grand Duchy of Lichtenburg. Upon her arrival, she becomes entangled with Cosmo Constantine, head of the Conservative Radical party – too proud to accept an American loan to bail out his bankrupt country, but unable to refuse her own offer to save the 300-year-old Lichtenburg fair from cancellation. Sparks fly between Sally and Cosmo – romantic and otherwise. But her interference in the local politics triggers her recall to Washington. Berlin’s remarkable score includes “It’s a Lovely Day Today,” “The Best Thing for You,” “The Ocarina,” and a Berlin counterpoint specialty: the incomparable duet “You’re Just in Love” (“I Hear Singing and There’s No One There”) – try, if you can, to get this tune out of your head!

Lyrics & Music by………………………………Irving Berlin
Book by………..Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse
Stage Director:……………………………………….. Steven Daigle
Conductor:……………………………………………..Steven Byess
Choreographer:……………………………………Carol Hageman
Dance Captain and Assistant Director:……………………Spencer Reese
Set Designer:…………………………………………….Kim Powers
Costume Designer:………………………………. Charlene Gross
Lighting Designer:…………………………………………. Erich Keil
Sound Designer:………………………………………….Andy Kauff
Mrs. Sally Adams……………………………………….Alexa Devlin, Olivia Maughan
Kenneth Gibson………………………………………………………Stephen Faulk
Princess Maria……………………………………………………………Tara Sperry
Cosmo Constantine………………………………………………Ted Christopher
Sebastian Sebastian………………………………………………. Stefan Gordon
Pemberton Maxwell…………………………………………………Michael Lucas
Senator Gallagher Acheson……………………………………..Anthony Maida
Senator Brockbank…………………………………………………….. Jacob Allen
Congressman Bill Wilkins………………………………………Clark Sturdevant
Congressman Harry Gibson…………………………………….. Aidan Smerud
Miss Philips……………………………………………………………….. Janie Crick
Clerk………………………………………………………………… Jayson Lebaron
Court Chamberlain………………………………………..Christopher Oglesby
Grand Duke (Otto) of Lichtenburg ………………………………Boyd Mackus
Grand Duchess (Sophie) of Lichtenburg………………..Julie Wright Costa

Ensemble

Various Senators, Townspeople of Lichtenburg, Socialites, Politicians Jacob Allen, Natalie Ballenger, Grace Caudle, Colin Commager, Julie Wright Costa, Chelsea Friedlander, Andrew Gilstrap, Stefan Gordon, Hannah Kurth, Jayson Lebaron, Michael Lucas, Anthony Maida, Wendy Marck, Andrew Maughan, Olivia Maughan, Emily Nelson, Christopher Oglesby, Jamie Rappaport, Sarah Roth, Arielle Schmidt, Aidan Smerud, Clark Sturdevant, Gretchen Windt

Die Fledermaus

(1874) Music by Johann Strauss II, Libretto by Richard Genée, and Carl Haffner, Translation by Ruth and Thomas Martin
No stage work so magically evokes the elegance and effervescence of life in Vienna as does Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus. Its 1874 premiere ushered in the Golden Age of Viennese Operetta – within a few years, Vienna had supplanted Paris as the operetta capital of the world. Based on German and French farces, the story unfolds as a plot by Dr. Falke to avenge his earlier embarrassment on being dumped in a park, drunk and wearing a bat costume, by the well-to-do Gabriel Eisenstein following a masked ball. Falke invites Eisenstein, his wife Rosalinda, and their chambermaid Adele to a party thrown by the perpetually bored Prince Orlofsky. None of the three knows of the other invitations and, as part of Falke’s scheme, each arrives at the party in disguise. Add to the mix an operatic tenor and former suitor of Rosalinda, a determined prison warden, an incompetent lawyer, and a drunken jailer … and you have the ingredients for operetta at its best. The amusing interplay of the characters is supported by a dizzying array of Strauss tunes: a drinking song by Rosalinda’s suitor Alfred, a tribute to champagne, Rosalinda’s famous csardas, coloratura flights by Adele, and, of course, the expected selection of Strauss waltzes, polkas, and marches.

Music by………………………………………………Johann Strauss, Jr.
Original German Libretto by……………. Richard Genée and Karl Haffner
English Translation by……….Ruth and Thomas Martin
Stage Director:……………………………………. Ted Christopher
Conductor:………………………………………… Jonathan Girard
Choreographer:……………………………………Carol Hageman
Set Designer:……………………………………….Murdock Lucas
Costume Designer:………………………………. Stefanie Genda
Lighting Designer:……………………………..Weston Wilkerson
Sound Designer:………………………………………….Andy Kauff
Gabriel von Eisenstein………………………………………………..Daniel Neer
…………………………………………………………………………Stefan Gordon
Rosalinda………………………………………………………………… Tara Sperry, Tanya Roberts
Alfred………………………………………………………………Andrew Maughan, Anthony Maida
Adele……………………………………………………………………… Emily Nelson
Dr. Blind…………………………………………………………………Michael Lucas
Dr. Falke………………………………………………………………..Boyd Mackus
…………………………………………………………………………..Nathan Brian
Frank………………………………………………………………….Jayson Lebaron
Sally…………………………………………………………………… Arielle Schmidt
Frosch……………………………………………………………………… Jacob Allen
Prince Orlofsky…………………………………………………… Olivia Maughan, Gretchen Windt
Ivan………………………………………………………………………..Spiro Matsos

Ensemble

Guests at Orlofsky’s Party Grace Caudle, Christopher Calderazzo, Colin Commager, Janie Crick, C.J. David, Sarah Diller, Chelsea Friedlander, Andrew Gilstrap, Paul Holmes, Adrienne Jones, Hannah Kurth, Michael Lucas, Wendy Marck, Spiro Matsos, Christopher Oglesby, Jamie Rappaport, Sarah Roth, Arielle Schmidt, Aidan Smerud, Mark Snyder

The Pirates Of Penzance (The Slave of Duty)

(1879) Music by Arthur Sullivan, Libretto by William Gilbert
No Gilbert and Sullivan stage work boasts as many walk-away tunes as their 1879 The Pirates of Penzance, whose official world premiere took place in New York City under the supervision of G&S themselves. Building on the success of the previous year’s H.M.S. Pinafore, but trading – as their satirical focus – the rigors of naval discipline for the obligations of duty, G&S manage to burlesque their normal share of popular institutions, including the army, the police, and operatic sopranos. Pirate apprentice Frederic, at age 21, has faithfully served out his indentures and, replete with a sense of duty, joins the police force, determined to exterminate his old mates. He falls in love with Mabel, the first girl he sees, but the daughter of Major-General Stanley, who himself is the target of a pirate revenge plot. Plans go awry when it is revealed that, thanks to a leap-day birth, Frederic is really only five and one-quarter years old. The engaging musical score includes some of the catchiest music in operetta: Mabel’s pyrotechnic “Poor Wandering One!;” the tongue-twisting patter song “I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major-General;” “A Policeman’s Lot;” “Climbing over Rocky Mountain” – a survivor from Thespis, G&S’s lost first stage work; and “With Catlike Tread,” which, more than a quarter-century later, was given new words as “Hail, Hail, the Gang’s All Here.”

Music by……………………………………… Arthur Sullivan
Libretto by…………………………………… William Gilbert
Stage Director:……………………………………….. Steven Daigle
Conductor:………………………………………… Lynn Thompson
Choreographer:……………………………………Carol Hageman
Dance Captain, Choreographer and Assistant Director:……….Spencer Reese
Set Designer:……………………………………….Murdock Lucas
Costume Designer:……………………………….Adrienne Jones
Lighting Designer:…………………………………………. Erich Keil
Sound Designer:………………………………………….Andy Kauff
Major-General Stanley………………………………………………Boyd Mackus
The Pirate King………………………Aidan Smerud, Ted Christopher, Stefan Gordon
Frederic……………………………………….Andrew Maughan, Clark Sturdevant
Sergeant of Police……………………………………………..Andrew Gilstrap
Mabel……………………………………………………….Chelsea Friedlander
Ruth…………………………………………………………..Julie Wright Costa
Edith……………………………………………………………… Sarah Diller
Kate…………………………………………………………………Hannah Kurth
Isabel…………………………………………………………….Janie Crick

Ensemble

Chorus of Pirates, General Stanley’s Daughters, Policemen Nathan Brian, Christopher Calderazzo, Grace Caudle, Colin Commager, Janie Crick, C.J. David, Sarah Diller, Stephen Faulk, Stefan Gordon, Paul Holmes, Hannah Kurth, Jayson Lebaron, Wendy Marck, Emily Nelson, Christopher Oglesby, Jamie Rappaport, Spencer Reese, Tanya Roberts, Sarah Roth, Mark Snyder, Tara Sperry, Gretchen Windt

Oh, Lady! Lady!

(1918) Music by Jerome Kern, Lyrics by P. G. Wodehouse, Book by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse
Between 1915 and 1924, composer Jerome Kern teamed with librettists/lyricists Guy Bolton and famed British author/humorist P. G. Wodehouse on a series of intimate musical comedies – the so-called Princess shows (four of the shows opened at Broadway’s 299-seat Princess Theatre). They featured not the exotic locales and the dukes and duchesses of operetta, nor the lavish spectacle of the Ziegfeld Follies, but rather the romantic and comic entanglements of everyday Americans, in current dress and modern dialogue. These shows forever changed the landscape of Broadway; Richard Rodgers, Cole Porter, George Gershwin, and numerous others credited these musicals with inspiring their own development and quest for a theatrical style. Among American songwriters, Kern was the supreme melodist – no more convincingly showcased than in his 1918 Princess musical Oh, Lady! Lady!! The story focuses on wedding plans of Mollie Farrington and Willoughby “Bill” Finch, which are temporarily derailed by the objections of Mollie’s mother, the arrival of Bill’s old flame May, and the heist of the Farrington family jewels by the ex-girlfriend of Bill’s valet Spike. Wodehouse was at his wittiest and most playful, introducing characters named May Ann Ayes, Lettice Romayne, and Cassie Roll. And Kern’s score bristles from beginning to end with catchy, sentimental tunes, including the song “Bill,” which was eventually dropped from the score, but resurfaced a decade later in Show Boat.

Music by…………………………………………………. Jerome Kern
Book & Lyrics by………….Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse
Stage Director:……………………………………….. Steven Daigle
Conductor:…………………………………………. Lynn Thompson
Choreographer:……………………………………..Carol Hageman
Dance Captain and Assistant Director:……….Spencer Reese
Set Designer:………………………………………….Murdock Lucas
Costume Designer:………………………………… Charlene Gross
Lighting Designer:…………………………………………. Erich Keil
Sound Designer:………………………………………….Andy Kauff
Mollie Farringdon…………………………………….Wendy Marck
Mrs. Farringdon…………………………………Julie Wright Costa
Willoughby “Bill” Finch……………………………….Nathan Brian
Hale Underwood………………………………………….. Jacob Allen
Spike Hudgins…………………………………………….. Daniel Neer
Fanny Welch……………………………………………… Alexa Devlin
May Barber…………………………………………………..Tara Sperry
Cyril Twombly………………………………………….Michael Lucas
William Watty…………………………………………….Mark Snyder
Parker………………………………………………………… Sarah Diller
Fisher………………………………………………………Hannah Kurth
Whitney……………………………………………… Natalie Ballenger
Brewster……………………………………………………… Emily Neill
Elsie………………………………………………….. Natalie Ballenger
Miss Clarette Cup…………………………………Jamie Rappaport
Miss Cassie Roll…………………………………….. Arielle Schmidt
Miss Miss Lotta Pommery…………………………Hannah Kurth
Miss Hallie Butt……………………………………..Olivia Maughan
Miss May Anne Ayes…………………………………..Grace Caudle
Miss Sal Munn…………………………………………Tanya Roberts
Mr. Artie C. Hoke……………………………………. Spencer Reese

Ensemble

Bridesmaids, Friends of Mollie’s and Willoughby’s Natalie Ballenger, Christopher Calderazzo, Grace Caudle, Colin Commager, C.J. David, Sarah Diller, Andrew Gilstrap, Paul Holmes, Hannah Kurth, Michael Lucas, Olivia Maughan, Emily Neill, Jamie Rappaport, Spencer Reese, Tanya Roberts, Arielle Schmidt, Aidan Smerud, Mark Snyder

Dream City and The Magic Knight

(1906) Music by Victor Herbert, Libretto by Edgar Smith, New Performance Edition by Steven Daigle
“A hit from start to finish,” “A new type of popular entertainment,” “A lift or two higher than anything of the kind.” These words, from the New York Times opening-night review of Victor Herbert’s Dream City and The Magic Knight, only begin to capture the ecstatic response of the New York press to one of the most remarkable shows to grace the early-20th-century Broadway stage. Herbert wrote the show, billed as “a dramatic pipe in two puffs,” to accommodate the desire of show producer Joe Weber (of Weber and Fields music hall fame) to create a “higher level of entertainment.” Farmer Wilhelm Dinglebender of Malaria Center, Long Island is offered a 25-percent stake in a Dream City to be built on Dinglebender’s property by fast-talking real estate con artist J. Bilkington Holmes, who promises the farmer that he will soon be richer than John E. Rockefeller. Dinglebender ponders the offer, falls asleep, and dreams that the city has been built. Rich beyond measure, he has been appointed mayor and must, among his responsibilities, attend the opera. So horrible an experience is it that he has Dream City dynamited, only then awakening from his dream. Herbert’s score is a revelatory amalgam of diverse musical styles: ragtime, vaudeville, country music, musical comedy, operetta, opera, music hall – unlike anything that Herbert wrote before or after. The composer’s spoof of Wagner’s Lohengrin during the second-act sequence within the Dream City opera house is absolutely hilarious – “a triumph of musical fooling,” as reported by the New York Tribune.

Music by……………………………………………………………………… Victor Herbert
Book & Lyrics by……………………………………………………………… Edgar Smith
New Performance Edition by………………………………………. Steven A. Daigle
Additional Orchestrations and Reconstructions by…………….. Steven Byess
Stage Director:……………………………………………………………….. Steven Daigle
Conductor:……………………………………………………………………….Steven Byess
Choreographer:……………………………………………………………..Carol Hageman
Assistant Director:…………………………………………………………..Spencer Reese
Set Designer:……………………………………………………………………… Cassie King
Costume Designer:………………………………………………………… Stefanie Genda
Lighting Designer:……………………………………………………………. Eric Norbury
Sound Designer:…………………………………………………………………..Andy Kauff

DREAM CITY
Wilhelm Dinglebender…………………………………………………………. Daniel Neer

A Long Island truck farmer with a dreamy disposition and a chronic distaste for labor
Maria Dinglebender………………………………………………………..Julie Wright Costa

His wife, with energy enough for two and a bossy disposition
Nancy Dinglebender……………………………………………………….. Natalie Ballenger

The Dinglebender’s daughter and the belle of Malaria Center
Amanda Boggs……………………………………………………………………….. Alexa Devlin

The ‘help’ for the Dinglebenders
J. Bilkington Holmes……………………………………………………………….Nathan Brian

A real estate boomer, with the plans for an ideal city
Seth Hubbs………………………………………………………………………. Andrew Maughan

Village hackman, and the oracle of Malaria Center
Henri d’Absinthe……………………………………………………………………..Stephen Faulk

An artist in search of atmosphere
Henry Peck……………………………………………………………………………Anthony Maida

A city flat dweller, spending the weekend with his family in the country
Mrs. Henry Peck…………………………………………………………………….Olivia Maughan

His wife, with alleged society connections in the metropolis

The Peck Daughters:
Mabel………………………………………………………………………………………..Wendy Marck
Maude………………………………………………………………………………………Tanya Roberts
Gladys………………………………………………………………………………………Hannah Kurth

Willie, A kid from Malaria Center………………………………………………..Michael Lucas
Old Man Platt, A relic……………………………………………………………………Mark Snyder
Joe Snediker, Village Romeo…………………………………………………………. Jacob Allen
Hank Schudder, Village Romeo………………………………………………. Jayson Lebaron
Hen Conklin, Village Romeo…………………………………………………………….C.J. David
Rembrandt, A footman……………………………………………………. Christopher Oglesby
Messenger Boy……………………………………………………………..Christopher Calderazzo
Policeman…………………………………………………………………………………Hannah Kurth

THE MAGIC KNIGHT (30-minute burlesque in the second act)

Elsa, A typical grand operatic maiden in the usual distressing predicament………………….. Emily Nelson
Ortrud, Her contralto aunt, given to dabbling in the art of magic……………..Julie Wright, Costa Frederick
Her hen-pecked uncle…………………………………………………………………………………………….. Aidan Smerud
The King, A base monarch………………………………………………………………………Ted Christopher Lohengrin
A professional rescuer of distressed maidens…………………………………………………………..Clark Sturdevant
The Swan/Godfrey, An item in a foul conspiracy…………………………………………………………Michael Lucas

First Knight…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….Stefan Gordon

Three Knights
Lastnite…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Stefan Gordon
Tunite…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..Christopher Oglesby
Tumaronite……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Andrew Gilstrap

Ensemble

Citizens of Malaria Center, Knights, Maidens, Men-At-Arms, Pages, Vassals Jacob Allen, Natalie Ballenger, Christopher Calderazzo, Grace Caudle, Colin Commager, Janie Crick, Sarah Diller, C.J. David, Chelsea Friedlander, Andrew Gilstrap, Stefan Gordon, Paul Holmes, Hannah Kurth, Jayson Lebaron, Michael Lucas, Anthony Maida, Wendy Marck, Olivia Maughan, Emily Nelson, Christopher Oglesby, Jamie Rappaport, Tanya Roberts, Arielle Schmidt, Mark Snyder, Clark Sturdevant, Gretchen Windt

The Yeomen Of The Guard

(1912) Music by Emmerich Kálmán Libretto by Robert Bodanzky, Karl von Bakonyi and Franz Martos, New Performance Edition and Translation by Steven Daigle
Hungarian-born composer Emmerich Kálmán has, in recent years, reassumed the position that he held almost a century ago as the world’s most performed operetta composer. His shows are perpetual staples in virtually all of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia. But no company in the world has championed his works with greater dedication than The Ohio Light Opera. In 2014, continuing its survey of the composer’s complete stage works, OLO presents its eleventh Kálmán title – the rarely performed 1912 operetta The Little King (originally Der kleine König). Inspired by the love affair of famed French singer-actress Gaby Deslys and Portugal’s King Manuel II, who at age 20 was forced into exile, the plotline concerns a boyish monarch who falls hard for a visiting opera singer, unaware that she is the daughter of a revolutionary plotting his assassination. During her visit to his palace, she has a bomb implanted in a bouquet of roses that she has ordered for the king. Only at the last second, when she can no longer resist his charms, does she discreetly defuse the bomb. Their almost-explosive love affair blossoms … until he learns of her revolutionary connections, shuns her, and is forced into exile by the Republican uprising. Some time later, on the French coast, surrounded in exile by only his loyal followers, the King welcomes a visitor …. The musical score features Kálmán’s ever-captivating blend of Viennese waltzes and haunting Hungarian harmonies and rhythms, as well as the first-ever use of a tango in a Viennese stage work.

Music by…………………………………………………………………………….Emmerich Kálmán
Original Libretto by………..Karl von Bakonyí, Franz Martos, and Robert Bodanzky
Translation & English Performance Edition by………………………….Steven A. Daigle
Literal English Translation by……………………………………………..Alexander Butziger
Stage Director:…………………………………………………………………………. Steven Daigle
Conductor:…………………………………………………………………………………Steven Byess
Choreographer:………………………………………………………………………Carol Hageman
Dance Captain:………………………………………………………………………..Spencer Reese
Set Designer:……………………………………………………………………………… Cassie King
Costume Designer:………………………………………………………………… Charlene Gross
Lighting Designer:…………………………………………………………………….. Eric Norbury
Sound Designer:…………………………………………………………………………..Andy Kauff
The King ………………………………………………………………………………Clark Sturdevant
Field Marshal General Lincoln……………………………………………Christopher Oglesby
Admiral Montbrison ……………………………………………………………………. Daniel Neer
A Chief of Police………………………………………………………………………Jayson Lebaron
The Lord Chamberlain ………………………………………………………………Michael Lucas
The Colonel………………………………………………………………………………..Nathan Brian
The Lieutenant………………………………………………………………………… Aidan Smerud
Lieutenant Lancelot ………………………………………………………………….Stephen Faulk
Anetta Montarini ………………………………………………………………… Natalie Ballenger
Huck ………………………………………………………………………………………Anthony Maida
Zaza ……………………………………………………………………………………….Gretchen Windt
Daisy………………………………………………………………………………………. Arielle Schmidt
Fifi ………………………………………………………………………………………..Jamie Rappaport
Hedy …………………………………………………………………………….Christopher Calderazzo
Doltschi ……………………………………………………………………………………. Spencer Reese
An Old Lackey……………………………………………………………………………..Michael Lucas
A Petty Officer…………………………………………………………………………………..C.J. David
“My Darling”………………………………………………………………… Bonnie, The Greyhound

Ensemble

Soldiers, Maids, Members of the Court, Navy Officers Christopher Calderazzo, Janie Crick, C.J. David, Sarah Diller, Alexa Devlin, Chelsea Friedlander, Stefan Gordon, Paul Holmes, Adrienne Jones, Jayson Lebaron, Michael Lucas, Olivia Maughan, Daniel Neer, Emily Nelson, Christopher Oglesby, Jamie Rappaport, Spencer Reese, Tanya Roberts, Arielle Schmidt, Aiden Smerud, Tara Sperry

2013 Season

The King and I

(1951) Music by Richard Rodgers. Book and Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. Based on “Anna and the King of Siam” by Margaret Landon. Original Choreography by Jerome Robbins

Placing his hand on her waist and issuing the command “Come!” the King of Siam and Anna launch into what must be Broadway’s most exuberant dance sequence. The polka “Shall We Dance,” together with such R&H classics as “I Whistle a Happy Tune,” “Hello, Young Lovers,” “Getting to Know You,” and “I Have Dreamed,” all support an endearing, but bittersweet, tale of the clash between Eastern and Western cultures. When the attractive English widow Anna arrives in Siam to serve as governess for the King’s children, she confronts a monarch who is willing to adapt to Western values, but whose pride and sense of tradition ultimately prove an obstacle. When Anna’s efforts to champion the love of Burmese courtier Lun Tha and his beloved Tuptim – who is being gifted to the King – fall on deaf ears, Anna readies to leave Siam. But news reaches her that the King is very ill … When The King and I closed in 1954 after 1,246 performances, it joined Oklahoma! and South Pacific as the three longest-running book musicals in Broadway history. Come to OLO and see why!

Conductor: J. Lynn Thompson
Stage Director: Jacob Allen
Choreography: Carol Hageman
Costume Design: Amber Marisa Cook
Scenic Design: C. Murdock Lucas
Lighting Design: Erich R. Keil
Dialect Design: Paul Meier Dialect Services
Thai Translations: Tawatos Phadungsoondararak

Captain Orton: Garrett Obrycki
Louis Leonowens, Anna’s son: Elizabeth Perkins
Anna Leonowens, a widowed Briton: Tanya Roberts
The Interpreter: Gregory LaMontagne
The Kralahome, the King’s prime minister: Edward Hanlon
The King, the King of Siam: Ted Christopher
Phra Alack: Alexander Turpin
Lun Tha, Burmese scholar, in love with Tuptim: Christopher Nelson* Clark Sturdevant**
Tuptim, Burmese slave: Elise Kennedy
Lady Thiang, the King’s chief wife: Alexa Devlin* Sarah Best**
Prince Chulalongkorn, the King’s eldest son and heir: Gerard Berroteran
Sir Edward Ramsay: Stefan Gordon
Princess Ying Yaowalak: Maddie Rae Frazier
Principal Dancer: Hannah Kurth
Uncle Thomas: Gregory LaMontagne
Little Eva: Wendy Muir
King Simon: Luke Hefner
Topsy: Natalie Ballenger
Children: Alexis Armstrong, Anna Christopher, Madeleine Christopher, Noelle Crites, Gracelynn Lepold, Taylor Mills, Joanna Spiker, Marius Stoll, Anneliese Wagoner  

Ensemble
Tara Austin, Natalie Ballenger, Ezra Bershatsky, Alexander Brickel, Alexia Butler, Janie Crick, Nadia Fayad, Stefan Gordon, Luke Hefner, Lawren Hill, Lara Korneychuk, Benjamin Krumreig, Hannah Kurth, Gregory LaMontagne, Michael Lucas, Brooke Morrison, Wendy Muir, Jesus Murillo, Garrett Obrycki, Jarrett Smith, Tara Sperry, Alexander Turpin

Silk Stockings

(1955) Music and Lyrics by Cole Porter. Book by George S. Kaufman, Leueen MacGrath and Abe Burrows

Suave, sophisticated, and filthy rich, Cole Porter brought more of himself and his times to his stage works than any of his contemporaries. His double entendres – some quite risqué – were so cleverly integrated into his lyrics that they sailed right over the heads of the censors into the laps of his audiences. Closely based on the 1939 film Ninotchka, starring Greta Garbo, Porter’s final Broadway show, Silk Stockings, represents, according to The New York Times, “the best goods in the American musical comedy emporium.” Russia has sent the stern and ice-cold envoy Ninotchka to Paris to retrieve a composer, who, encouraged by his American agent Steve Canfield, is thinking of defecting. Steve and Paris work their magic on Ninotchka, but her Russian pride intervenes and she returns to her home country. Steve follows, but is detained for conspiracy to undermine the government. The immensely witty dialogue bristles with Cold War gibes: When informed that the composer Prokofiev is dead, a Russian official retorts: “I didn’t even know that he was arrested.” The score contains many Porter gems, including “All of You,” “As on Through the Seasons We Sail,” “Paris Loves Lovers,” “Satin and Silk,” and “Stereoscopic Sound.”

Conductor: Jonathan Girard
Stage Director: Steven Daigle
Choreography: Carol Hageman
Costume Design: Whitney Locher
Scenic Design: Kimberly V. Powers
Lighting Design: Erich R. Keil

Peter Ilyitch Boroff: Clark Sturdevant
Hotel Doorman (Alexis): Mark Snyder
Hotel Manager: Benjamin Krumreig
Flower Girl: Tara Austin
Maid: Olivia Maughan
Ivanov: Gregory LaMontagne
Brankov: Christopher Nelson
Bibinski: Edward Hanlon
Steve Canfield: Nathan Brian
First Commissar: Stephen Faulk
Guards: Jarrett Smith, Alexander Brickel
Vera: Elise Kennedy
Commissar Markovitch: Garrett Obrycki
Choreographerv: Ezra Bershatsky
Ninotchka: Sarah Best
Reporters: Stephen Faulk, Ezra Bershatsky, Luke Hefner, Mark Snyder, Jesus Murillo
Janice Dayton: Alexa Devlin
Waiter (Pierre Bouchard): Spiro Matsos
Chief Commissar: Jesus Murillo
Minister: Michael Lucas
President of Politburo: Jarrett Smith
Saleslady: Lawren Hill
M. Fabour: Stephen Faulk
Bookstall Man: Alexander Brickel
French Comrade: Michael Lucas
Movie Director: Jesus Murillo
Assistant Director: Benjamin Krumreig
A girl: Tara Austin
Sonia: Nadia Fayad
Grisha: Ezra Bershatsky
Bather: Luke Hefner
Anna: Alexia Butler

Ensemble
Tara Austin, Ezra Bershatsky, Alexander Brickel, Alexia Butler, Janie Crick, Stephen Faulk, Nadia Fayad, Luke Hefner, Lawren Hill, Elise Kennedy, Lara Korneychuk, Benjamin Krumreig, Michael Lucas, Spiro Matsos, Olivia Maughan, Jesus Murillo, Garrett Obrycki, Tanya Roberts, Jarrett Smith, Mark Snyder, Tara Sperry, Clark Sturdevant 

H.M.S. Pinafore

(1878) Music by Arthur Sullivan. Libretto by William S. Gilbert

Gilbert and Sullivan’s rollicking romp through naval life, class distinctions, and melodramatic villainy has entertained millions since its London premiere. Where else can one find a First Lord of the Admiralty who had never seen a ship, or a seafaring captain who gets seasick, or a nursemaid who can’t tell one baby from another? It was the 1879 success of this show in New York – and during that year, there were said to be more than 150 productions playing across the United States – that inspired the American musical community to create its own musical theater tradition. Josephine, the Captain’s daughter, is in love with able seaman Ralph Rackstraw. But her father has other plans for her: an advantageous union with the exalted Sir Joseph Porter, K.C.B. When the young couple’s elopement is thwarted by cantankerous seaman Dick Deadeye, it remains for Little Buttercup to confess that her baby-farming techniques had left something to be desired … a many years ago. Never mind the why and wherefore – to list the catchy tunes in Pinafore is to cite the entire musical score. Discover or rediscover for yourself why H.M.S. Pinafore, returning for its 15th season at OLO, has been the Company’s most performed show.

Conductor: J. Lynn Thompson
Stage Director: Julie Wright Costa
Choreography: Carol Hageman
Costume Design: Adrienne Jones
Scenic Design: Kimberly V. Powers
Lighting Design: Michael Banks
Assistant Choreographer: Sarah Best

The Right Hon. Sir Joseph Porter, K.C.B., First Lord of the Admiralty: Ted Christopher
Capt. Corcoran, commanding H.M.S. Pinafore: Stefan Gordon
Ralph Rackstraw, able seaman: Stephen Faulk* Benjamin Krumreig**
Dick Deadeye, able seaman: Edward Hanlon
Bill Bobstay, boatswain’s mate: Ezra Bershatsky
Bob Becket, carpenter’s mate: Nathan Brian
Tom Tucker, midshipmite: Sara Giray
Josephine, the Captain’s daughter: Natalie Ballenger* Lawren Hill**
Hebe, Sir Joseph’s first cousin: Olivia Maughan
Little Buttercup, a Portsmouth bumboat woman: Alexa Devlin

Ensemble
Tara Austin, Ezra Bershatsky, Nathan Brian, Alexia Butler, Janie Crick, Sarah Diller, Nadia Fayad, Edward Hanlon, Luke Hefner, Hannah Kurth, Gregory LaMontagne, Andrew Maughan, Olivia Maughan, Wendy Muir, Christopher Nelson, Garrett Obrycki, Tanya Roberts, Tara Sperry, Clark Sturdevant, Alexander Turpin

The Gypsy Baron

(1885) Music by Johann Strauss, Libretto by Ignaz Schnitzer, English Translation by Ruth and Thomas Martin

Forgoing the light-hearted atmosphere of champagne in Die Fledermaus and gondoliers in A Night in Venice, Johann Strauss, in The Gypsy Baron, turned to a less frivolous Hungarian tale of gypsies, lost treasures, and class conflict. The dizzying array of toe-tapping tunes – rollicking, romantic, and sentimental – attests to Strauss’ success in combining the best of the Viennese waltz and Hungarian gypsy rhythms. Government officials have returned to Barinkay dispossessed family property. Neighboring pig farmer Zsupán tries successfully to interest him in a tactical marriage with his beautiful daughter Arsena. She, however, will accept nothing less than a baron for her husband. When Barinkay is ennobled as baron by a band of gypsies, but is still refused by Arsena, he plights himself to the gypsy girl Saffi, but backs off when he learns that she is the daughter of a Hungarian pasha. He joins the Hussars, returns as a war hero, and gets the girl – but which one? From the instantly recognizable “Treasure Waltz” to Barinkay’s remarkable catalogue aria in which he enumerates his past occupations to an anvil chorus reminiscent of Verdi, this is Viennese operetta at its most engaging.

Conductor: Steven Byess
Stage Director: Steven Daigle
Choreography: Carol Hageman
Costume Design: Whitney Locher
Scenic Design: Cassandra King
Lighting Design: Erich R. Keil

Ottokar, young farm hand, only child of Mirabella Stephen Faulk
Count Carnero, emissary of the Empress of Austria Stefan Gordon
Sándor Barinkay, adventurer Andrew Maughan
Czipra, a gypsy matriarch, Saffi’s mother Julie Wright Costa
Kálmán Zsupán, rich pig farmer, neighbor of Barinkay Jesus Murillo
Laczi, servant of Zsupán Mark Snyder
Mirabella, mother of Ottokar, governess of Arsena Olivia Maughan
Arsena, daughter of Zsupán Elise Kennedy
Count Peter Homonay, Hungarian statesman and veteran Hussar Christopher Nelson
Saffi, a gypsy girl Tara Sperry
Pali, a gypsy Nathan Brian
Ferkó, a gypsy Luke Hefner
Józsi, a gypsy Clark Sturdevant
A Gypsy Michael Lucas
A Boatman Jarrett Smith
Two Girls Alexia Butler, Nadia Fayad
A Man Jarrett Smith
Herald Benjamin Krumreig
Vendors of Vienna Hannah Kurth, Wendy Muir, Emily Neill

Ensemble: Tara Austin, Natalie Ballenger, Nathan Brian, Alexander Brickel, Alexia Butler, Janie Crick, Nadia Fayad, Raphael Gunn, Luke Hefner, Lawren Hill, Lara Korneychuk, Benjamin Krumreig*, Hannah Kurth, Gregory LaMontagne, Michael Lucas, Wendy Muir, Emily Neill, Christopher Nelson, Garrett Obrycki, Jarrett Smith, Mark Snyder, Tara Sperry, Clark Sturdevant, Alexander Turpin

* Understudying the role of Sándor Barinkay

Lady, Be Good!

(1924) Music by George Gershwin, Lyrics by Ira Gershwin, Book by Guy Bolton and Fred Thompson

A landmark show, Lady, Be Good! was George Gershwin’s first Broadway collaboration with brother Ira, and the show that confirmed the stardom of Fred and Adele Astaire. Just as importantly, in George’s musical hands, it brought jazz and fascinating rhythm, front and center, to the Broadway stage. The plot focuses on brother and sister orphans, Dick and Susie Trevor, who are evicted from their lodgings by the wealthy, scheming Josephine Vanderwater, who has her sights set on Dick. He, however, is in love with Shirley Vernon, but feels that he has no choice but to marry Jo. Susie, in the meantime, has paired up with a disheveled passerby, Jack Robinson, who is the disinherited nephew of a wealthy, now-deceased uncle. Complications arise by way of lawyer Watty Watkins, who convinces Susie to impersonate a wealthy Mexican widow as part of a scheme to save his own skin. Gershwin “standards” include the title song, “Fascinating Rhythm,” “So Am I,” “Hang on to Me,” “The Half of It, Dearie, Blues,” “Little Jazz Bird,” and (believe it or not) a patter song with yodeling, “Swiss Miss.”

Conductor: Steven Byess
Stage Director: Ted Christopher
Choreography: Carol Hageman
Costume Design: Charlene Gross
Scenic Design: C. Murdock Lucas
Lighting Design: Michael Banks

Dick Nathan Brian
Susie, his sister Natalie Ballenger
Shirley Elise Kennedy
Josephine Vanderwater Tara Sperry
Jack Robinson, hobo Christopher Nelson
Buck Benson, go-getter for Life magazine Michael Lucas
Sammy Cooper, his photographer Andrew Maughan
Watty Watkins, a slick lawyer Ezra Bershatsky
Estrada, a Mexican menace Alexander Turpin
Mr. Parke, trustee of Seth Robinson estate Mark Snyder
Jess, his butler Alexander Brickel
Bertie Bassett, sheriff’s assistant Gregory LaMontagne
Sheriff’s Assistant Stefan Gordon
Daisy Sarah Best
Policeman Garrett Obrycki
Man Jarrett Smith
Flunky (Jenkins), servant Jesus Murillo
Boy Benjamin Krumreig
1st Girl Wendy Muir
2nd Girl Alexia Butler
3rd Girl Lara Korneychuk
Girl Hannah Kurth

Ensemble: Sarah Best, Alexander Brickel, Alexia Butler, Janie Crick, Alexa Devlin, Stefan Gordon, Lara Korneychuk, Hannah Kurth, Benjamin Krumreig, Andrew Maughan, Olivia Maughan, Wendy Muir, Jesus Murillo, Emily Neill, Garrett Obrycki, Tanya Roberts, Jarrett Smith, Mark Snyder